Closing Techniques in Sales: The Ultimate Guide for B2B Sales

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Ben Franklin once famously said, “Never leave ’till tomorrow which you can do today.” This quote perfectly captures the essence of closing sales – you need to seize the moment to get prospects to commit. For B2B sales reps, closing the deal represents the moment of truth. All the effort spent building relationships, understanding needs, presenting solutions – it ultimately hinges on your ability to encourage prospects to sign the dotted line and seal the deal. Strong sales closing techniques in B2B sales separate the top sales reps from the average.

Yet closing deals remains an enigma to many sales reps. Some sales reps see it as a dark art of manipulation or overly pushy sales tactics used to encourage prospects that are not ready to buy today. In reality, sales closing done right is the culmination of value creation. The best sales closing techniques involve guiding hesitant prospects to a logical next step based on the trust you’ve built.

Seasoned sales reps view every interaction as part of the sales process. They ask questions and listen to understand prospect’s pain points and motivations. The best sales reps are strategic; they gain upper hand and commitments progressively, not all at once. They anticipate doubts, address objections transparently, and encourage prospects to imagine the impact of purchasing their product or service.

This sales closing guide draws from the sales closing experiences of veteran B2B sales professionals. Consider it a masterclass in the nuance and strategy behind the best sales closing techniques. We’ll cover recognizing buying signals, customizing approaches, overcoming sales objections (Learn How to Overcome Sales Objections with Chat GPT), and closing sales with integrity.

Learn how to confidently handle objections, create urgency without being pushy, and leverage psychology to influence the purchasing decision. Equipped with these sales closing techniques, you’ll be able to successfully guide prospects across the finish line.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

  • Build rapport early in the sales process by actively listening, understanding needs, and establishing trust. This lays the foundation for closing success later.
  • Sprinkle in trial closing questions throughout conversations to take the prospect’s temperature and gauge interest level. This provides insights to advance the deal without being pushy.
  • Sales objections present opportunities to demonstrate value by addressing concerns directly. Handled right, this builds credibility and momentum.
  • Appeal to the prospect’s core motivations and problems to show how your solution is uniquely positioned to help them achieve goals. Align with what matters most.
  • When prospects seem ready to commit, clearly yet tactfully ask for the business using a specific call-to-action. Avoid vague questions. Provide a clear path for them to say yes.
  • Carefully confirm all details of agreements reached during closing to prevent misunderstandings later. Nail down specifics of pricing, timelines, contracts etc.
  • Proactively prepare tailored responses to common sales objections likely to arise at closing. Get out in front of concerns before they derail deals.
  • Continuously study new sales closing techniques and refine through roleplaying and practice.
  • Seek frequent feedback from peers and mentors to identify blindspots and improve closing approach. An outside perspective is invaluable.
  • Develop authentic confidence and comfort level with closing through experience, adopting a consultative mindset, and reviewing recordings of sales calls to self-critique.

What are closing techniques in sales?

Closing techniques in sales refer to strategic methods sales reps use to gain commitment from prospects to advance deals. Effective techniques include summary closes to recap details, assumptive closes that assume the sale, addressing objections, asking trial closing questions, creating urgency, and adding incentives.

A Complete List of Closing Techniques in Sales

Mastering the art of closing deals requires having a versatile toolkit of modern sales closing techniques to call upon based on the situation. While rapport building and needs qualification set the foundation, knowing when and how to ask for the business separates average reps from rainmakers. This comprehensive list of the most effective sales closing techniques equips you with a closing playbook spanning beginner to advanced sales closing techniques. From classic sales closing techniques like the assumptive close to newer solutions-focused closes, explore approaches tailored to different personalities and contexts.

There are certain sales closing techniques, like the Ultimatum Close or the Shame Close, that I wouldn’t recommend sales reps use. However, for the sake of giving you the complete list of sales closing techniques, I’ve included those techniques in this guide.

Sales Situation Recommended Sales Closing Techniques
Prospect is overwhelmed by many product options and tiers Alternative closing technique, Goldilocks technique, Shopping list close, Bracket close
Prospect cites budget limitations as main purchasing obstacle Affordable close, Concession close, Cost of ownership close
Prospect desires social validation before committing Testimonial close, Backwards Close, Similarity close, Standing room only close
Prospect has short attention span or gets interrupted during a sales meeting Selective Deafness Close or Distraction Close, Repetition close
Prospect continuously drags out sales cycle with delays Calendar close, Future close, Never-the-best-time close
Prospect expresses feeling pressured by sales rep to decide too quickly Adjournment Close, Yes-set close
Prospect raises vague or generic objections without specifics Conditional close, Doubt close, Minor points close, Needs close, Retrial close, Sharp angle close technique
Prospect needs clearly defined action plan to move deal forward Requirements close
Prospect highly values sales rep expertise and consultative guidance Extra information close, Professional suggestion close, Rational close, Ask-the-manager close
Prospect voices distrust of sales rep pushing unwanted products Customer care close, Empathy close
Prospect has inflated ego and wants to be flattered Compliment close, Embarrassment close, IQ close
Long-term customer feels undervalued relative to new customer deals Valuable customer close, Exclusivity close
Prospect drags feet near deal completion Bonus Close, Takeaway close, Ownership close, Puppy dog close, Thermometer close
Prospect needs emotional motivation Emotion close, Columbo close, Opportunity cost closing technique, Treat close, Quality close, Visualization close
Complex sale requires gaining alignment across multiple decision makers Video close, Companion close, Handover close, No-hassle close
Quick low-risk purchase Assumptive close, Bonus Close, Price promise close, Puppy dog close
Prospect needs real reason for immediate action vs further delays Empty offer close, Give-take close, Hard close or Direct close, Now-or-never close, Fire sale close
Prospect is very analytical Balance Sheet Close, Benjamin Franklin close, 1-2-3 Close, Analytics Close, Diagram close
Prospect feels overwhelmed by options and needs clear summary 1-2-3 Close, Alternative Closing Technique, Bracket close, Goldilocks technique, Summary close technique
Prospect feels steamrolled by sales process Customer care close, Golden bridge close, Trial close
Prospect distrusts marketing hype Calculator close, Reverse psychology close, Save-the-world close
Prospect likes sales rep Compliment close, Courtship close, Handshake close, Humor close
Prospect responds to shame and guilt Shame close, Embarrassment close
Prospect responds to urgency Best time close, Hurry close or Urgency close, Now-or-never close, Ultimatum close

Sales Closing Techniques Myths

Alright, before jumping into exploring sales closing techniques let’s talk about some of the biggest sales closing technique myths that have been peddled around the sales world for far too long.

  • “Always be closing.” This “brilliant” advice will have you coming across as a desperate, pushy salesperson that prospects will avoid like the plague. Great closing techniques happen naturally as part of the sales process, not by beating someone over the head with a metaphorical club.
  • You need a “Sharp Angle Close” to corner prospects. Corner them and they’ll just bite your hand off out of self-defense. This closing technique is about as effective as wrestling a grizzly bear. Hard pass.
  • The “Urgency Close” creates a false sense of scarcity. You know what also creates scarcity? Having zero customers because everyone saw through your high-pressure tactics and bailed. Prospects aren’t idiots. They can smell a rat when you dangle a “limited time offer” in their face.
  • Go for the “Alternative Close” to give them a second choice. Or a third choice. Or a fourth. At a certain point, you’ve just given the prospect so many options that their head is spinning. Congratulations, you’ve successfully wasted both of your time. Be very careful with the “alternative close technique”.
  • The “Question Close” is a softer way to nudge buyers. Oh, you mean pester them with a million questions until they say “yes” just to shut you up? That’s not closing a sale, it’s an interrogation! I want to sell something, not violate the Geneva Conventions.
  • The “Empathy Close” makes prospects feel understood. More like makes them feel like you’re a condescending therapist who thinks nodding and saying “I understand” automatically resolves their objections. Closing a sale requires more than putting on a sad clown act. Be very careful with this sales closing technique.
  • The “Reverse Psychology Close” sneakily convinces them to buy. Because playing mind games is a great way to build trust with potential customers and not at all a sign ‘You Might Be a Sociopath’. Not recommended for newbie sales reps.
  • The “Opportunity Cost Close” makes prospects realize what they’re missing. What they’re missing is the chance for you to stop yammering about opportunity costs and make a coherent sales pitch for once. Less economics 101, more explaining why your product or service fits their needs.
  • The “Impending Event Close” capitalizes on upcoming occasions. “What better way to celebrate [X holiday] than buying my [Y product]?” How about celebrating by not being pandered to with corny seasonal ties that cheapen your offering?

In the end, many “cheesy” sales closing techniques just come across as manipulative, tone-deaf, and amateurish. They reek of desperation rather than professional consultative selling. Maybe ditch the gimmicks and actually listen to what the buyer needs?

Sales closing techniques 1 of 77:
1-2-3 Close

1-2-3 sales closing technique idea is to distill your sales pitch down to a compelling trio of your product or service benefits. For example: “This software will save you time, cut costs, and reduce errors.” The three points work together to drive home the value of your product.

I don’t just rattle off random points. I carefully select a unified set with maximum impact. Like a one-two combo followed by a knockout blow. The first two soften them up, and the third seals the deal.

At first I felt cheesy using the 1-2-3 sales closing technique. But I’ve found even the most hesitant prospects often respond to the memorable three-point summary. The 1-2-3 closing technique gives them an easy way to visualize what’s in it for them. The key to closing deals with the 1-2-3 closing technique is keeping it crisp and customized. Avoid sounding robotic.

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Sales closing techniques 2 of 77:
Adjournment Close

Early on, I’d get frustrated whenever a potential client didn’t commit on the first call. I took it as a rejection. But over time, I learned the art of the adjournment sales closing technique – tactfully giving a potential customer space rather than forcing a rushed purchase decision.

Now when I sense a potential client needs more time, I say something like “I know this is an important buying decision, so let’s table this for now. When would be a good time to reconnect and discuss next steps?”

Giving a potential customer breathing room in your sales process shows empathy and helps build rapport and goodwill, strengthening the relationship. And when we discuss later, I find prospects have had time to fully process and often close a sale on their own terms.

The key to this sales closing technique is setting the expectation that they’ll decide soon. “Let’s plan to discuss this next Friday when you’ve had time to review” keeps momentum.

Of course, I only do this when I feel confident they’ll come back ready to pull the trigger after consideration. Extending time to chronic tire kickers is pointless. But when used judiciously, adjourning sales closing technique helps build trust and saves difficult situations. Try it rather than pushing someone not ready. Patience pays off.

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Sales closing techniques 3 of 77:
Affordable Close

When pricing concerns arise, my first step is asking questions to understand exactly what they can afford per month or per year. Once I know their threshold, I can tailor payment terms accordingly. I’ll strip down the offering if needed to find an acceptable base model. The goal is making the outcome work within their financial reality, not mine.

I also remind prospects of the full lifetime costs and risks of not upgrading. Common objections often melt away when sales reps clearly explain pricing. This helps a potential customer see the bigger picture. Affordable sales closing technique requires patience and flexibility from sales reps. I never force prospects into arrangements they’ll regret later. My priority is solving their obstacle, not making the max buck from each individual.

With some creativity, you can often find workarounds to seemingly unaffordable deals. See every concern as an opportunity to tailor your product or service offering.

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Sales closing techniques 4 of 77:
Alternative Closing Technique

I used to overwhelm prospects by presenting too many options and variables. I’d end up confusing them rather than closing deals.

Now I keep it simple. When a prospect is on the fence, I’ll narrow it down and say something like “Would you prefer the Business plan or the Enterprise upgrade?”

Giving clear A or B choices makes it easier for them to envision the purchase decision. Alternative Closing Technique subtly implies they are getting something either way.

I’ll emphasize my recommended option when offering the choices. For example, “Would you rather go with the premium annual plan or just start with the basic monthly plan?” A slight nod on “premium” can also help steer them.

Too many choices can paralyze a potential customer. Simplifying to a couple straightforward alternatives makes deciding easier. Potential customers often just need that little nudge to move in the right direction. Of course, I’m careful not to box a potential client into something they don’t want. The goal is guiding your potential client to a good fit, not forcing my preference. But a gentle alternative closing technique often close deals faster.

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Sales closing techniques 5 of 77:
Analytics Close

Try to not present complex solutions without addressing prospects’ hesitations. Instead, take a page from Benjamin Franklin sales closing technique and methodically map out pros and cons.

You can literally draw two columns on a whiteboard – “Advantages” and “Considerations.” Then discuss tangible product’s benefits like cost savings, revenue upside, productivity gains, etc. But also candidly address implementation challenges, change management, required resources.

This balanced analysis will demonstrate that you’re not a one-sided sales rep. You help them scrutinize from multiple angles. Once all cards are on the table, the logical path to moving the deal forward becomes clear.

Of course, you need to guide the discussion so pros outweigh cons. But that conclusion arises organically, not forced. Encourage prospects to take the analytical journey. It creates informed buy-in.

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Sales closing techniques 6 of 77:
Ask-the-Manager Close

I used to hate asking managers for bigger discounts – it always felt like begging. Then I tried framing it as me taking on the battle on the customer’s behalf. This small mindset shift completely changed my approach.

Now if customers need discounts beyond my authority, I say, “Tell you what – let me talk to my manager and see if I can convince him to stretch for you.” I make a show of the dramatic negotiation.

I’ll come back saying, “Well he took some persuading, but I went to bat for you and got us down to $X.” Suddenly I’m the hero who won them a deal rather than a powerless sales rep.

This sales closing technique works and can be quite effective – overuse it and potential customers get wise. But when genuine added value is needed, framing it as overcoming the manager rather than begging them can make that extra discount feel justified rather than expected. Give it a shot!

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Sales closing techniques 7 of 77:
Assumptive Close

When I first started selling, I waited for prospects to explicitly say “yes” before moving the deal forward. I worried being presumptuous would turn them off. But this hesitancy cost me more deals than I can imagine.

Now once I feel we’re aligned, I smoothly transition to sales closing questions:

“What day shall we schedule delivery?”

“Will you be paying by check or credit?”

By subtly acting as if they’ve already committed, it’s harder for prospects to abruptly say no. After all, we’ve been having a productive discussion all along.

The key to the assumptive close technique is reading verbal and non-verbal cues so I’m not forcing it with someone who is clearly not ready. I maintain a casual, helpful tone – never aggressive. But once mutual understanding is established, assuming the logical next steps in the sales process keeps things moving.

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Sales closing techniques 8 of 77:
Backwards Close

Traditionally, I’d only ask for referrals after closing deals. But now I often start sales conversations with this request – it immediately positions me as an advisor, not a sales rep.

I’ll say something like: “Who comes to mind that could benefit from improved sales engagement?”

This backward approach puts the prospect at ease. As I describe a product or service that could help people they know, it naturally leads into an exploratory discussion of prospect’s pain points and their own needs, not a sales pitch. Referral into value proposition flow enables a low-pressure opening and helps build rapport and trust.

Try flipping the script – sometimes starting from the end gets you to closing deals faster.

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Sales closing techniques 9 of 77:
Balance Sheet Close

Only selling the positives and ignoring any drawbacks or concessions usually creates doubt when prospects inevitably consider downsides later.

Now I directly address objections and possible cons upfront:

“The upfront cost is higher, but long-term TCO (Total Cost of Ownership) is lower…”

“You’ll need to learn the new software, but it will save over 200 work hours a year…”

I actually write out a physical pros and cons list! Seeing the clear advantage builds credibility. I’m transparent, not one-sided.

I make sure to keep cons brief and focus on overwhelming product benefits. But simply acknowledging drawbacks first disarms skepticism. And hearing me walk through it helps me builds trust in my impartiality. I let the obvious value argument speak for itself.

Try it! Oftentimes, the objective balance still lands firmly on the buy side. But defusing doubts first clears the path to closing deals.

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Sales closing techniques 10 of 77:
Benjamin Franklin Close

When prospects are on the fence, methodically mapping pros and cons brings clarity. You can draw two columns and have them walk through:

Pros: Increased sales conversions, time savings from automation, improved customer analytics, etc.

Cons: Training time, subscription fees.

Benjamin Franklin Close exercise helps crystallize priorities. Once all the considerations are on the table, the logical path becomes clear. Try to guide discussion so pros like ROI outweigh cons like costs. But let hesitant prospects arrive there more on their own vs pushing them.

Visualizing tradeoffs makes potential customers confront reality beyond fuzzy generalizations like “it costs too much.” Hard data drives decision making process.

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Sales closing techniques 11 of 77:
Best Time Close

Early on, I’d get deflated whenever prospects said they’d “think about it” or “come back later.” But then I realized these were just excuses – they rarely returned.

Now when I sense hesitation, I emphasize the advantages of buying now:

“Our holiday sale ends today so you’ll save 20% if you purchase by tonight.”

“Our team’s bandwidth gets tight toward year end as current clients renew. Engaging us now ensures you get priority attention rather than rushed service.”

I remind them of the risks of delaying – missing the deal, season changing, stock selling out. Potential customers always overestimate the chances of “coming back.” I also relate timing to their personal situation: kids’ birthdays, upcoming trips, retirement. Whatever hooks show urgency.

Of course, I avoid pressure sales techniques in my sales process. But highlighting fleeting advantages often motivates action. Try it subtly next time you hear “We’ll think about it.”

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Sales closing techniques 12 of 77:
Bonus Close

Strategic spontaneity can pay off. Now if a good prospect is on the fence, I’ll unexpectedly throw in a sweetener:

“Tell you what – since you’ve been so great to work with, I’m just going to throw in an extra two weeks of free trial.”

It’s not a huge giveaway for me, but delights the customer. And it often provides that small extra nudge they need to close a sale.

The key is keeping it genuine – I reserve this for customers I truly appreciate. Can’t overdo it. But a small, unexpected bonus reframes the deal as a bargain hard to pass up. It also builds reciprocity and goodwill.

Seeing the customer’s smile when I surprise them makes the tiny concession worthwhile. Try it – a well timed bonus can help you close deals faster.

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Sales closing techniques 13 of 77:
Bracket Close

I used to just throw out a single price and hope it stuck. But prospects would get analysis paralysis, unsure if it was too high or too low.

Now I give 3 pricing options – high, medium, and low:

“Our Enterprise Package B with all the bells and whistles starts at $1,500 monthly. Now our popular Enterprise Package A is $500 and it is a great fit for most. Or the Business plan is just $280 if you want a barebones option.”

Having the bracketed comparison gives context. The middle fits nicely between the overkill high end and the stripped down low end. It also makes prospects feel smarter – “Wow I didn’t need that ridiculous $1,500 plan!” And avoids cheapness of the bottom option.

The key is making the middle clearly the sweet spot. Prospects want the deal that hits the value bullseye for them. Give them the target, and your sales closing rate improves.

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Sales closing techniques 14 of 77:
Calculator Close

Rather than blurting out prices, I’ll often slowly punch numbers into a calculator, acting like I’m deducing the perfect deal for them step-by-step.

“Let’s see, our list price is $6,000…take off the 15% referral discount…throw in free onboarding…aha! I can get this down to $5,100 for you.”

I turn the calculator screen to show the verdict. The deliberation makes the price seem carefully tailored vs. a canned quote. Now of course I prep these in advance. But showing the work lends authority. They see the math, not just my word.

I avoid overusing this since it can feel theatrical. But once in a while, thowing in the calculator taps into that reptilian “ooh, numbers!” part of our brains. The price seems ironclad.

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Sales closing techniques 15 of 77:
Calendar Close

Early on, I’d get frustrated when prospects requested follow-ups without committing. It felt like stalling. But I learned to embrace scheduling future sales meetings – it keeps more deals alive that might otherwise die.

Now when a potential customer is on the fence, I say:

“No problem, let’s circle back next Thursday when you’ve had more time to review. I’ll send over some additional materials beforehand.”

I get the date in their calendar immediately so it feels real. Simply keeping engaged, even if loosely, gives deals legs.

Of course, I confirm specifics on what we’ll cover and any prep needed. The time should move the deal forward. I also send reminder emails leading up to the sales meeting to keep me top of mind. And I leverage the prep meeting as a reason to connect sooner if needed.

View follow-ups not as postponed rejections but progress in the relationship. Plant those future dates – it gives you another chance to nurture the opportunity.

Back to the Sales Closing Techniques List.

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Easily video-narrate sales presentations or proposals when needed (otherwise video is optional). Redo slide if you made a mistake. Use built-in teleprompter to record longer videos.

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Company profiles
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Sales closing techniques 16 of 77:
Columbo Close

The Columbo sales closing technique is named after the television detective Columbo, who was famous for saying “just one more thing…” at the end of an interview before asking a key question that helped him solve a case.

In B2B sales, the Columbo sales closing technique works similarly – you act like the sales discussion is over and start wrapping up, before coming back with “just one more thing” to ask a final closing question.

This sales closing technique catches the prospect off guard since they thought the conversation was finished. By looping back suddenly, you can ask a direct closing question without the prospect resisting since their guard is down.

An example Columbo Close could be:

“Well Jesse, I think we’ve covered all the points you wanted to discuss about our platform. I’ll follow up with pricing options for the features we outlined. Oh just one more thing – if we’re able to keep implementation costs within that $50K budget, are you ready to move forward with getting your sales teams trained on this?”

The key is acting like the substantive part of the conversation is complete before sneaking in your real closing question while the prospect believes you’re just confirming next steps. Done right, it subtly nudges them to commitment when their defenses are down.

The Columbo Close allows you to re-engage at the last minute for a final closing push when prospects assume the sales meeting is already wrapping up. Catch them off guard and gain upper hand and commitment.

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Sales closing techniques 17 of 77:
Companion Close

Rather than selling just to my target prospect, I’ll engage any companions with them too – colleagues, assistants, etc.

I’ll ask their opinion and leverage their feedback:

“Jen, as the head of operations what’s your perspective on our proposed workflow improvements?”

When they express interest, I loop it back to the real decision maker:

“You have an astute COO there. Jen’s absolutely right that streamlining approvals will save your sales teams time.”

The key to effective sales process is engaging with stakeholders beyond just the primary decision maker – VPs, department heads, steering committee members, etc. Get their genuine input and feedback, and tie it back to reinforcing for the DM. Avoid just paying them lip service.

Leverage consensus, but let it build naturally. Forcing it comes off disingenuous.

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Sales closing techniques 18 of 77:
Compliment Close

Complimenting prospects sometimes may come across as disingenuous flattery. But I’ve learned sincere admiration can help build rapport.

When meeting with a potential client, you can say things like:

“The way you’re innovating in this space is remarkable.”

This shows I’ve done my homework on them. It builds confidence in working together.

Of course, I keep it genuine. Over-the-top praise raises skepticism. I focus on traits and accomplishments I authentically admire. Establishing that baseline of appreciation makes a potential client more receptive when I later make recommendations. I’m not just a vendor – I’m a fan.

Try wearing your admiration on your sleeve more. A little deserved praise goes a long way.

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Sales closing techniques 19 of 77:
Concession Close

Rather than just listing my offerings, now I’ll proactively add in concessions:

“For new clients, I typically throw in dedicated support the first month.”

“If you sign this quarter, I can lock in 10% off list pricing.”

Either I tie the perk directly to closing quickly, or give it freely to spark reciprocity. But I stay honest – overpromising erodes trust. The key is surprising them with something they want but didn’t expect. This resets their reference point to feel like they’re now getting a deal.

I don’t overuse Concession Close in my sales process – that can feel too manipulative at times. But strategic concessions make customers feel valued beyond just the transaction. The goodwill pays dividends.

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Sales closing techniques 20 of 77:
Conditional Close

Early on, I’d spend forever trying to directly overcome prospect objections – “Let me explain why our API is actually robust…” But obstinate prospects stayed stuck.

Now I use a conditional sales closing technique – I offer to resolve their concern, if they’re willing to commit. For example:

“I understand needing proof we can integrate with your CRM. If I can get you a demo showing our APIs working together by end of day, will you be ready to finalize the contract?”

This makes it a simple transaction – I satisfy their objection, they purchase. It gives them skin in the game to share the solution.

The key is phrasing it as “If I do X, will you do Y?” Structuring it this way draws them into accepting the conditional exchange. It also incentivizes me to really understand and address objections, not just deflect it. Win-win.

Of course, I only use Conditional Close in my sales process if I’m confident I can deliver on resolving their concern. Don’t set yourself up to fail. But approached genuinely, the conditional close builds trust and momentum.

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Sales closing techniques 21 of 77:
Cost of Ownership Close

Rather than getting fixated on upfront pricing with prospects, I shift the conversation to total cost of ownership.

I’ll say things like: “While our monthly fee looks slightly higher, our 2 year retention data shows clients achieve 27% greater ROI long-term.”

Or: “We build in premium support and training that others charge as add-ons – so our total lifetime investment is actually 20% less.”

The key is zooming out beyond just initial cost. I put detailed ROI spreadsheets and TCO (Total Cost of Ownership) studies in front of prospects. Seeing the fully loaded 3-5 year outlook framed holistically often gets hesitant prospects over the hump. They realize the greater lifetime value offsets higher nominal fees. Fuller perspective anchors on business impact, not just nominal costs. Shifting minds to the long game helps me win on value.

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Sales closing techniques 22 of 77:
Courtship Close

Prospects don’t want to be “sold” – they want a trusted advisor. These days, I take more of a courtship approach, really getting to know potential customers – their needs, values, personality. I look for ways to compliment who they are, not just what they do.

Over time, this builds a relationship beyond the transaction. I become someone they enjoy interacting with. Of course, I keep this professional – no crossing lines. But little acts of service and appreciation add up. Eventually selling becomes more like a trusted advisor making a careful recommendation, not a sales pitch. I’ve found when prospects see you authentically care, they’re far more receptive to your guidance.

The key is patience and sincerity. Courtship can’t be faked or rushed. But when done right, they come to appreciate you and not just what you’re offering. Try it.

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Sales closing techniques 23 of 77:
Customer Care Close

Rather than just letting leads go cold, I follow up as if I’m in customer service doing a survey. You can say something like:

“Hi John, I’m Sarah from customer success team. I just wanted to check in on your experience with our sales process – were your questions answered thoroughly? Did the sales rep listen closely to your needs?”

This shows we truly value feedback for improvement beyond just closing deals. And it softens them up for me to then address objections again. I can offer concessions like a discounted price which they appreciate. Of course I disclose I’m from sales, not deception. But approaching with the customer service mindset puts them at ease to reopen the discussion. And the consultation feedback is extremely helpful.

Try it for warm leads that seem to need just a bit more nurturing. Customer care can turn cold calls warm again.

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Sales closing techniques 24 of 77:
Diagram Close

In my early sales days, I just walked prospects through a dense PowerPoint sales pitch packed with words and stats. Their eyes would glaze over. Now I incorporate visual diagrams and drawings as I present. This simple shift has worked wonders.

I’ll sketch by hand flowcharts of how our process improves their workflow. Or Venn diagrams showing how our tools integrate with other solutions. Using colors and illustrations makes it more engaging. And I narrate as I sketch, guiding them through the story step-by-step. This keeps their attention focused, rather than glossing over busy slides.

Of course I practice my diagrams thoroughly beforehand. Can’t be fumbling during the sales pitch. But drawing things out in real-time helps concepts click more than pre-made slides alone. Prospects tell me they remember my sketches long after follow-ups. You get double the points if you squeeze a bit of humor on your sketches! The visuals and narratives stick. And seeing me put in that effort helps build rapport and goodwill too.

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Sales closing techniques 25 of 77:
Hard Close or Direct Close

Once you’ve aligned on a product or service and overcome all objections, you can shift to directly asking for the business. The Hard Close or Direct sales closing technique is simply asking a direct question that prompts a “yes” or “no” commitment.

An example would be:

“Based on our discussion today and the proposal I’m sending over, are you ready to move forward with upgrading to the Enterprise Plan for your sales teams?”

Hard close technique cuts through any vagueness after the core sales conversations occur. In my sales process, I avoid assumptions and clearly request confirmation one way or the other.

Hard close technique can feel blunt at first. But directness establishes clarity on next steps one way or another. And more often than not, it secures the close. Of course, I only go direct once rapport is established and possible objections addressed. But a simple, to-the-point closing question gets answers.

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Sales closing techniques 26 of 77:
Doubt Close

Many sales reps immediately go on the defensive as soon as they sense any hesitation from prospects. They try to convince them that the product or service they’re selling is right for the prospect. But this just makes them more doubtful.

Try voicing their doubt before they can:

“I get the sense you’re not totally convinced we’re the best fit. Am I right?”

When they hear their concern mirrored, most customers can’t help but explain why I’m wrong. Once they voice their reasons, you can address objections. But the key is doing it conversationally, not confrontationally. You’re not attacking their doubts, just gently bringing them into the open.

This shows you truly listened to their body language and unspoken concerns. Ironically, vocalizing doubts first builds more trust to then overcome them.

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Sales closing techniques 27 of 77:
Economic Close

Prospects often hyper-focus on upfront costs rather than long-term value. Now I steer conversations to total economic impact:

“While our monthly fee looks higher, over 2 years the ROI has been 27% greater for clients with needs like yours…”

“Buying the full package vs mid-tier is more expensive at first, but the volume pricing saves over 40% down the line…”

I’m transparent on pricing but also show I’m strategizing holistically for their finances. In my sales process, I break out spreadsheet models demonstrating lower total cost, not just nominal fees. This reassures prospects I’m not trying to maximize short-term gain. I’m crafting solutions optimized for their economic realities.

Of course, I only offer valid savings – no fluff or empty upsells. But focusing on total value over time frames investment costs wisely. Long-term thinkers make ideal clients.

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Data rooms
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Company profiles
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Sales closing techniques 28 of 77:
Embarrassment Close

I used to think appealing to ego when selling to businesses was manipulative. But I’ve learned that subtle pride and vanity play roles at certain points. Now when I sense a prospect wants the prestige of partnering with a “premium” vendor but may settle for a cheaper option, I’ll say:

“We find our solution appeals most to industry leaders pursuing aggressive goals rather than those seeking basic capabilities.”

This frames the higher-end option as prestige rather than excess. People don’t want to see themselves as going cheap. Of course, I keep it professional – no shame sales tactics. But reminding them of the impression conveyed and peers they’d be joining can motivate action.

We all have egos. A delicate appeal to pride, positioned as helping them achieve ambitions, can sometimes make the difference and reduce the sales cycle.

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Sales closing techniques 29 of 77:
Emotion Close

Many prospects decide emotionally and justify logically. Here’s how you can take them on a journey:

“Imagine the relief your sales teams will feel having this tedious process automated…”

“Your customers will be delighted by the new customer experience…”

I incorporate testimonials and vivid customer success stories to inspire how they’ll feel using our platform. Potential customers connect better to emotions than data. The key is making it authentic and ethical. I know my product delivers the emotions I evoke. I tap into positive feelings like pride, relief, joy – never fear or manipulation.

Sprinkling in emotion makes a dry sales pitch resonate. But subtly and sincerely. Don’t lay it on thick, but do remind them how your product or service will make them feel.

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Sales closing techniques 30 of 77:
Empathy Close

Early on, I’d get impatient listening to prospects describe their challenges. I just wanted to pitch solutions. But now I make sure to truly empathize first.

When they share frustrations, I’ll echo back “Yes, I can absolutely see how tedious those manual processes must feel…” This shows I’m really listening.

Only once I genuinely understand the prospect’s problems and their worldview do I position solutions. After walking in their shoes, I can guide them down the path I’d follow. It’s transformed my effectiveness. When I go with the empathy close, it feels like their natural conclusion rather than my sales push.

Of course, this sales closing technique works best only when you authentically care. Don’t fake empathy to manipulate. Fake empathy is easy to spot. But when you know prospect’s pain points personally, the right solutions become self-evident. They sense you just want to help. Listen with empathy, then let closing flow. When prospects feel deeply understood, they’ll follow your lead.

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Sales closing techniques 31 of 77:
Empty Offer Close

Sometimes when hesitant prospects are wavering, I’ll offer something that nudges them along:

“Tell you what – let’s get your sales teams set up with a trial portal they can start familiarizing themselves with now…”

Knowing they likely don’t have this already, it primes them to say “Oh, we’d need to purchase first for that…”

It positions me benevolently – I offered something extra at no cost. Even though they can’t accept, it builds reciprocity and goodwill. Makes purchasing feel like an exchange of favors between friends.

Of course, I only do this occasionally – overuse of this sales closing technique can feel manipulative. And I follow through graciously if they actually can accept the offer. But when used judiciously, an empty favor positions me as a helpful advisor rather than another sales rep. And gently moves them towards a natural next step in the sales cycle.

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Sales closing techniques 32 of 77:
Exclusivity Close

When I just started in B2B sales, I thought positioning offerings as exclusive limited deals would motivate decision makers and help me move deal forward. But most saw right through it as a sales ploy – one of the manipulative sales tactics. I was being transparently transactional rather than building a relationship.

Now I focus on conveying the uniqueness of solutions without gimmicks:

“This advanced analytics module is cutting-edge – only a few clients have adopted so far.”

Rather than make arbitrary requirements, I emphasize elite or premium status:

“We’ve had great success implementing this for innovation leaders like Company X.”

This appeals to their ambition without manipulation. I let exclusivity simmer as subtext rather than overtly dangle it. And I genuine ensure offerings merit exclusivity claims. Overplaying this erodes expertise.

A soft aura of exclusivity intrigues top clients. However, this sales closing technique works only authentically, not through sales tricks. They see through the hard sell, but gravitate to what makes them unique.

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Sales closing techniques 33 of 77:
Extra Information Close

Many inexperienced sales reps tend to overload prospects with excessive data trying to be comprehensive. But too much tires and overwhelms them.

What you should do is start with key details only. But if you sense hesitation, you’ll need to offer additional info:

“Would a demo of the real-time dashboard clarify the analytics capabilities?”

Or if they still seem uncertain I’ll ask openly:

“What other specifics would help you make a confident decision here?”

This shows I’m not pressuring them to close a sale before they have all the facts they need. I surface and address objections and doubts, not gloss over them. Providing transparency gives peace of mind. In my sales process, I avoid information overload upfront. But making it clear I’ll answer any question sincerely and comprehensively builds trust in the long run.

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Sales closing techniques 34 of 77:
Fire Sale Close

Try to avoid positioning special deals as “limited time fire sales” to create false sense of urgency. These sales tactics tend to backfire with savvy prospects as they can see right through the pressure sales techniques.

Now if you offer a special promotion and you’re transparent on the real reasons – an overstock situation, hitting volume tiers, etc. No contrived gimmicks.

For example: “We project lower demand next quarter, so I can offer you this quarter’s pricing for that period if you select your plan today.”

Rather than feigning desperation, you should focus on authentic reasons for real (but temporary) advantages. And you should be careful not to abuse this sales closing technique. Special pricing should be exceptional and driven by genuine situations. Overuse erodes trust and can greatly devalue your product or service.

Limited promotions genuinely tied to special situations can motivate action. But manufactured “fire sales” just torch credibility.

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Sales closing techniques 35 of 77:
Future Close

Rather than pressuring prospects to commit on the spot, now I’ll secure future plans:

“Let’s circle back next Thursday after you’ve had more time to review this proposal.”

If they’re uncertain, I ask targeted questions:

“What information would help you make a decision by month-end?”

“Shall I schedule demos of the reporting dashboard for your team?”

This keeps momentum without forcing it. Getting follow-ups in the calendar makes closure feel more imminent and actionable. And asking what they need to decide keeps me on point delivering value vs just hoping they come back.

Of course, I prep for future meetings to advance the sales cycle. The Future Close sales closing technique primes them to pull the trigger once objections are resolved. Patience paired with persistence pays off.

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Sales closing techniques 36 of 77:
Give-Take Close

When I first started selling, I tried some slick sales closing techniques – offering something enticing then rescinding it to create sense of urgency. But this always destroyed trust.

Now I avoid manipulative sales tactics in my sales process and focus on transparency. If I mention a bonus, discounted price or pilot, I follow through consistently. No bait-and-switches or false scarcity.

That said, I sometimes highlight time-sensitive advantages like expiring promotions transparently:

“We’re able to extend this one-time new client discount through the end of April if you select a plan this month.”

As long as I stand behind what I offer, timeframes are reasonable, and I’m upfront, this primes action without pressure. Promotions should incentivize, not manipulate. The old give-take sales tactics hurts credibility long-term. If you want to build rapport and trust, keep offers genuine, not Machiavellian.

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Sales closing techniques 37 of 77:
Golden Bridge Close

Rather than cornering prospects into selecting my product or service, I guide them to it indirectly:

“Standard onboarding works best for basic use cases, but for advanced workflows, our Premium Success Program gives the highest ROI.”

Or: “The entry plan won’t support your volume needs. The Enterprise plan is overkill. I recommend the mid-range Business plan based on what you’ve shared.”

I close off options transparently yet steer them to the logical fit. They discover it themselves vs feeling forced. This retains choice while gently leading. I avoid head-on pushiness that raises defenses. Sometimes a soft sideways nudge sticks better.

Of course, I ensure I know their needs inside and out first. Guidance only lands when it clearly serves them. Do that diligently, and they’ll follow your lead.

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Sales closing techniques 38 of 77:
Goldilocks Technique

When presenting options, I start with the premium tier:

“Our Enterprise plan has every bell and whistle – advanced analytics, integrations, unlimited users, dedicated support, etc. But it may be more than you need.”

Then I’ll share the Basic plan, but note its limitations:

“The Basic plan has core features only and lacks many key capabilities, has decks and links limitations, so I’d avoid recommending it.”

Finally, I position the Business plan as the “just right” middle ground:

“Our most popular Business plan has robust capabilities without unnecessary extras. Based on your needs, this is likely the ideal fit.”

The contrast makes the middle option feel like the smart choice – not overkill or underwhelming. Occasionally I’ll then upsell them from Business to Enterprise if budget permits. But anchoring on a logical middle option first is key. Potential customers love feeling they’ve found the “Goldilocks zone.”

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Custom branding
Showcase your brand.
Video narrations
Easily video-narrate sales presentations or proposals when needed (otherwise video is optional). Redo slide if you made a mistake. Use built-in teleprompter to record longer videos.

Data rooms
Attach any supporting files and links. Make it easy for your prospects and clients to find the right information quickly.

Company profiles
Create company profiles with custom banners and info-packages tailored to different industries.
Contact details
Show your contact info easily accessible by your prospects and clients.
Custom CTAs
Add custom CTAs to drive prospects or clients to your calendar, sign up form, etc.
Engagement analytics
See how prospects and clients interact with your PDFs.

Feedback and Reactions
Collect feedback from prospects and clients. Feedback and reactions are not publicly visible.
Share PDFs
Share any existing PDF presentations and documents.
Live links
Share with a single link. Update files even after sharing your link. Get notified when your PDF is viewed. Turn off access anytime.

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Sales closing techniques 39 of 77:
Handover Close

If I sense a prospect stalling with me, I’ll sometimes hand off to a colleague:

“Based on our discussion, this Business plan meets your needs well. Let me have Cynthia handle next steps like pricing and onboarding.”

The fresh face lets prospects reset mentally. And they may not rehash concerns already addressed.

Of course, we prep together to ensure continuity. And I avoid overusing Handover Close – relationship disruptions can backfire. But when used judiciously, handing off once terms are aligned but energy lags resuscitates momentum. Just be strategic in choosing the handoff point.

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Sales closing techniques 40 of 77:
Handshake Close

When I first started selling, I worried extending my hand for a handshake was too aggressive. But done right, it reinforces commitment.

Now when terms are settled, I’ll smile warmly, extend my hand, and say “Shall we wrap this up then?”

If they smile back and shake, it physically seals the deal. The contact clicks mentally.

Of course, I read body language carefully and only attempt this when positive vibes indicate we’re truly aligned. Don’t force it. But a handshake cements partnerships forged. As long as you’ve established real rapport, shaking on it transformed many tentative agreements into firm commitment for me.

Try it once everything else is properly in place. A well-timed handshake can concretize the intangible.

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Sales closing techniques 41 of 77:
Humor Close

I used to think humor was unprofessional. But I’ve learned strategic wit puts prospects at ease. Now I’ll occasionally quip:

“This contract is thicker than my college textbooks – remind me what fun is!”

Self-deprecating lines like this show I’m human too. Closing deals feel more collaborative versus stiff and formal.

Just like with Puppy Dog Close, I keep jokes clean and non-divisive. And I focus on relieving tension, not forcing laughter. If they don’t find it amusing, I simply move on. But sincere sales humor weaves in rapport and enjoyment. People want to work with those who make them feel good. An authentic laugh together sparks joy on both sides.

Try lightly poking fun at a mutual frustration. Shared laughter, not canned bits, bonds new partnerships with heart.

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Sales closing techniques 42 of 77:
Hurry Close or Urgency Close

Many new sales reps think that putting pressure on hesitant prospects with false sense of urgency would motivate them. But it only makes them defensive. Try to avoid aggressive hurrying at all costs in your sales process. Speak calmly and focus on solutions vs hype. If genuine deadlines like expiration dates apply, state them simply as facts.

Rushing prospects breeds tension and skepticism. They withdraw to avoid feeling cornered. I build trust by speaking thoughtfully, not filling silences with buzzwords and feigned excitement. Patience pays off far more than pressure. When I give considered responses, tailor to needs, and guide strategically, smart leaders recognize the value of your product in their own time.

If I’ve done my job nurturing the relationship, closing a sale happens organically, not forced. Good things come to those who wait. No need to sweat the clock. You should avoid using Hurry Close or Urgency Close sales closing technique. It’s not very effective in my experience.

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Sales closing techniques 43 of 77:
IQ Close

Rather than flattering prospects with false praise, I highlight legitimate accomplishments:

“I’ve enjoyed learning more about how you pivoted business models so adeptly last year.”

This shows I respect real success vs giving hollow compliments.

When discussing complex tools, I emphasize capability rather than complexity:

“I think you’ll find the analytics powerful yet simple to use given your savvy.”

I also sincerely ask their guidance collaborating on solutions. Intelligence attracts intelligence. While occasionally reminding them of past smart buying decision can help, lay it on too thick and it backfires. I focus on authentic recognition, not manipulation.

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Sales closing techniques 44 of 77:
Minor Points Close

Once we’ve aligned conceptually on solving their problem, I get prospects mentally invested by having them select specifics:

“Given the options, which regional data center would you want to host this in?”

“Of the three dashboard layouts, which design fits your needs best?”

Making a series of smaller decisions primes them for the major commitment. It also shows I’m ready to dive into details, not stay high-level. I avoid using this to pressure or manipulate. But thoughtfully guiding prospects through specifics turns abstract discussions into concrete action.

Try it once you’ve aligned on the vision. Minor point decisions in the decision making process pave the path to major commitments.

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Sales closing techniques 45 of 77:
Needs Close

Before jumping into your sales pitch, try to fully understand the prospect’s needs. Take time upfront to confirm that you understand their true requirements.

Before presenting your offering, make sure to recap your previous discussions. For example:

“Let me make sure I have this right – you need a platform that can handle 500 API calls per minute with sub-100 millisecond response times so your customers don’t experience latency, correct?”

This demonstrates you’ve been listening closely rather than glossing over details. And it primes them to see how I’ll address each need. Don’t directly push a product or service – first confirm you grasp their problems inside out. Needs aligned means more deals closed.

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Sales closing techniques 46 of 77:
Never-the-Best-Time Close

I used to accept prospects saying they’d “think about it” and get back to me later at face value. But I learned that’s usually just polite deflection.

When you hear “Let me think it over…” you can gently respond something along the lines:

“Of course, think it through. But just keep in mind that needs evolve, new priorities crop up. No time may feel perfect, but there’s always value in improving things now rather than later.”

This thoughtfully counters the myth that there’s an ideal moment. Tomorrow’s solutions rarely solve today’s problems. I remind them of the product benefits they’ll miss by waiting as well as the risks – competitors upgrading, problems compounding, options disappearing. With care, this shifts the lens.

But I avoid pressure. Just planting the seed that perfect timing is elusive, but value is here now. Try it next time you hear “We’ll think about it.”

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Sales closing techniques 47 of 77:
No-Hassle Close

Focusing narrowly on selling the features and leaving implementation details until post-sale is a big mistake. Many prospects get cold feet worrying about complex onboarding.

These days I emphasize end-to-end simplicity:

“No need to worry about the rollout – our onboarding handles everything start to finish.”

I proactively offer white-glove services:

“We can take care of content migration with no downtime or involvement from your team.”

Removing potential friction upfront reassures hesitant prospects and removes roadblocks. Of course, I emphasize the ease authentically – never overpromising. But detailing how we’ll minimize heavy lifting builds confidence in the sales process and full customer journey.

Try highlighting how you’ll make adoption smooth from purchase to go-live. Giving peace of mind pre-emptively turns sales friction into sales momentum.

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Sales closing techniques 48 of 77:
Now-Or-Never Close

Early on in my sales career I tried creating false sense of urgency with high-pressure sales tactics like “today-only deals.” But savvy prospects saw through this ruse immediately.

Now I focus on genuine value in the moment rather than fake time-sensitivity:

“Based on the timeline you shared, getting the accounts setup this quarter would let your team benefit from increased capabilities right away.”

Or transparently highlighting expiring promotions:

“Our free content migration offer does end this month with the quarterly budget reset.”

No more contrived gimmicks. But real unique advantages tied to genuine constraints can motivate action. The key is avoiding manipulated pressure. But thoughtfully highlighting a special benefit helps ethical sales reps spark action.

Back to the Sales Closing Techniques List.

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Sales closing techniques 49 of 77:
Opportunity Cost Closing Technique

Focusing solely on pricing versus competitors can lead prospects to start questioning whether it was worth the investment at all.

Instead, try discussing opportunity cost – what’s the real expense of not upgrading? Lost productivity? Lagging behind competitors? I explain:

“Keeping your legacy system may seem cheaper, but what’s the cost of routine outages in lost revenue?”

Opportunity cost closing technique shifts the frame. They see our product not just as an added cost but an investment towards goals. The lens changes from price to potential. Of course I back up these claims with real data – quantified hours wasted, projections if they don’t adapt to market shifts, etc. But that motivational perspective sticks.

Potential customers resist perceived “costs” but gravitate to “opportunities.” Opportunity cost closing technique reframes the narrative.

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Sales closing techniques 50 of 77:
Ownership Close

Instead of doubtful “if you buy” language, now I speak as if prospects already own and enjoy our solution:

“Which workflows will your sales teams want to automate first once the platform’s in place?”

Or I’ll admire the potential: “With these custom analytics dashboards, you’ll gain incredible visibility into your sales and marketing content effectiveness!”

This skips past deliberation to implicitly assuming usage. Of course I read receptiveness and avoid forcing it. But painting a vision of ownership makes product’s benefits hit home.

It frames integration as inevitable. People subconsciously move to align assumptions with reality. Bold but plausible future-pacing can manifest success.

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Sales closing techniques 51 of 77:
Price Promise Close

Oftentimes I see sales reps make empty promises like “Call me if you find it cheaper!” But that just makes them seem naive. Instead, be more thoughtful. If you feel that a discounted price would clinch a deal, offer to match a lower price they can document from a true competitor. But with care:

  • It must be an apples-to-apples solution
  • From a legitimate competitor
  • In writing

And set a deadline like 48 hours. Can’t let it drag out.

This shows good faith. But the onus is on them proving the claim versus you chasing ghosts. And only offer it selectively for deals on the fence. Don’t become the discount house. But occasionally matching a real competitive offer can be the nudge that wins the day.

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Sales closing techniques 52 of 77:
Professional Suggestion Close

I’ve learned that leaders appreciate guidance from experts they trust.

Once you’ve build rapport and trust, you can offer ideas tailored to their needs:

“Based on your growth goals, I’d recommend our Enterprise Plan. The unlimited API calls better future-proof demand.”

The key is only advising within my expertise, not overreaching. I avoid pushing products just for profit. My priority is customer success. I’m always open to discussing why the suggestion may not fit. But when credible, recommendations provide valuable direction.

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Sales closing techniques 53 of 77:
Puppy Dog Close

I used to think cutesy sales tactics like Puppy Dog Close were beneath sales professionals. But I’ve learned a touch of playfulness, when authentic, helps build rapport.

Occasionally I ham it up a bit on demos:

“Oh please, pleeease can we show you how the reporting works?”

The Puppy Dog Close is over the top on purpose, showing I don’t take myself too seriously. A little levity creates warmth. Silly, sure. But it makes the day more memorable. People want to work with those who make them smile.

Don’t overdo Puppy Dog Close. But allowing your inner child to gently poke through at times brings joy to the sales process.

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Sales closing techniques 54 of 77:
Quality Close

I used to focus on feature checklists and ROI. But prospects started pushing on price instead. Now I lead by emphasizing quality.

I share how industry leaders choose us for reliability:

“With some of the biggest companies in the industry trusting us for their sales and marketing needs, you know our platform is built to perform.”

And I discuss lasting partnership versus transactional vendors:

“Our obsessive service ethic has earned 98% client retention.”

I still cover functionality, but leading with quality differentiated by real metrics establishes premium value. They picture how we’ll make them stand out, not just fix a short-term issue. Of course, claims must hold up. But done right, quality sells itself long after the sales pitch fades.

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Sales meme - Tries Bosss great sales strategy, Loses biggest client

Sales closing techniques 55 of 77:
Rational Close

Instead of defaulting to a generic sales pitch or sales script, now I tailor logical, reasoned cases for each prospect. After aligning on their goals, I walk systematically through how our offering uniquely achieves each:

“You needed automated reporting – our custom dashboards deliver that. You required API integration – our platform does that seamlessly. And the real-time analytics addresses your need for up-to-date visibility.”

It’s simple but sound logic – here’s what you need, here’s how we deliver. I rely on reason, not pressure. Some still decide on emotion, but I find calmly guiding prospects through rationale sells those focused on logic. Try it next time reason prevails over hype.

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Sales closing techniques 56 of 77:
Repetition Close

When I first started selling, I worried repeating points seemed pushy. So I’d share something once and move on. Big mistake – ideas need reinforcement to stick. Now I’ll revisit key themes across a sales cycle:

“As we discussed last week, this analytics module will help you identify the most engaged prospects and clients …”

I don’t mind saying things 2-3 times. Repetition cements concepts without being aggressive.

I also repeat process steps:

“Let’s recap the plan – I’ll send the proposal today, we’ll review together on Tuesday…”

Our brains encode things more strongly with repetition. It boosts retention and follow-through. Of course, I vary wording and mix up examples. But thoughtful reiteration serves communication. Don’t fear useful repetition.

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Sales closing techniques 57 of 77:
Requirements Close

I used to think formal requirements gathering was only for large enterprise deals. But asking prospects to document needs in writing can clarify any deal. Now I’ll suggest:

“Let’s capture your key requirements so I can tailor the best plan.”

Putting it in their words tightens alignment. And seeing it formalized moves prospects closer to committing. Of course, I’m flexible – I don’t hold them to anything unreasonable. But the exercise builds trust and engagement and gets us literally on the same page. And having their needs in writing also helps me methodically demonstrate how I’ll meet each, building air-tight credibility.

Involve your prospects in requirements. Writing wants down evolves abstract discussions into concrete partnership building.

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Sales closing techniques 58 of 77:
Retrial Close

“No” is not always the end – no going back. I’ve learned creative persistence can flip rejected deals. Now if prospects decline, I’ll follow up:

“I understand, but I just want to make sure I presented things clearly. Would you be open to a quick call to recap the solution so I can improve my approach?”

Or: “We just announced expanded analytics. Let me share a demo highlighting the new capabilities.”

As long as I’m adding value, not just pestering, re-engagement technique works surprisingly often. Potential customers reconsider with fresh info. Of course, I know when to walk away if disinterest is strong in the potential customer. But tasteful follow-ups have resurrected many deals pronounced dead.

Keep bringing value and progress until you get an unequivocal “No.” Retrials build relationships, whether they close a sale or not.

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Sales closing techniques 59 of 77:
Reverse Psychology Close

When hesitant prospects raise an objection like “This seems too complex for our needs,” my natural instinct used to be to jump to explain why it wasn’t. But now I’ve learned that often simple agreement flips the script:

“You’re absolutely right, this does have more advanced capabilities than you require for your current situation.”

This catches them off guard, forcing them to reconsider their stance without me directly confronting them. Suddenly they have to clarify why they think it’s unsuitable, versus just making a blanket claim.

Only then do I slowly reopen the dialogue. The key to Reverse Psychology Close is reading reactions – for some this completely shuts them down. But used carefully, briefly placing the ball back in their court resets the power dynamic. And the renewed interaction lets me better understand their needs.

I don’t overuse Reverse Psychology Close, but deployed at the right time for objections that overgeneralize, simply concurring politely can prompt beneficial reevaluation.

The Reverse Psychology sales closing technique turns resistance into an opportunity for greater clarity on their needs. Try it when blanket negativity arises – it gets prospects thinking productively.

Don’t overplay it. But a touch of good-faith “reversal” can restart more deals that have stalled.

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Sales closing techniques 60 of 77:
Save-the-World Close

Many sales reps, when they first start selling, make exaggerated claims about impact to get prospects excited. But an intelligent potential customer usually can see right through these kinds of sales techniques and marketing hype.

Instead, try focusing on real business goals. Instead of “this will transform your organization!”, you can say:

“Automating this process could let your sales teams focus on more strategic work.”

Rather than lofty visions, you can tie your product or service benefits to tangible outcomes:

“Reducing this repetitive task from 2 days to 2 hours will exponentially increase productivity.”

The impact is still substantial, but framed practically. And I always quantify assumptions. Wild promises may temporarily spark interest but ultimately undermine credibility. Stay pragmatic in your sales process – genuine value needs no hyperbole.

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Data rooms
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Company profiles
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Sales closing techniques 61 of 77:
Selective Deafness Close or Distraction Close

Concerns that were raised by prospects and couldn’t be addressed early on would often lead me to become flustered and to obsess over countering them, but this would just amplify the negatives. Now I calmly redirect to the positives:

“I understand your concern on cost. But focusing on the value side, how might a faster sales cycle create new revenue opportunities?”

I listen closely, but guide gently back to productive ground rather than indulging unresolvable tangents. Of course, I don’t ignore real issues – I make note to follow up later with answers. But selectivity keeps sales momentum going.

Try it – selectively target their highest potential, not their loudest fears.

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Sales closing techniques 62 of 77:
Shame Close

Trying to subtly shame prospects into upgrading from legacy systems and implying that they look outdated in many cases will backfire and will come across as manipulative. Focus on positive ambition, not finger-wagging. I usually highlight how new solutions position them as an industry leader vs lagging behind.

For example: “This proactive analytics approach helped our client lead its segment.”

I also emphasize how upgrades better serve customers and employees. It’s about their ideals, not meeting some arbitrary external bar. Guilt and fear breed resentment. But relating improved capabilities to values and aspirations motivates change.

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Sales closing techniques 63 of 77:
Shopping List Close

I used to present a product or service before fully grasping needs. Now I oftentimes use Shopping List Close in my sales process. This sales closing technique works best in B2B SaaS sales.

First, I explicitly confirm their requirements: real-time tracking, custom reporting, integrations, etc.

Then I walk through how our platform delivers on each:

“You needed real-time tracking – our analytics module does that. Custom reporting – we provide custom reporting dashboards. HubSpot integration – we have a native integration with HubSpot.”

Seeing how I meticulously map to their specifications, not generic features, builds trust in fit. Of course, I don’t commit to anything unrealistic. But methodically demonstrating I understand their priorities and can deliver gives customers confidence.

Don’t sell what you have – fulfill what they want. Spell it out line-by-line!

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Sales closing techniques 64 of 77:
Sharp Angle Close Technique

When asked about capabilities by a potential customer, I used to give simple “yes” or “no” answers. But now I turn questions into sales closing opportunities:

Prospect: “Does your system integrate with Oracle ERP?”

Me: “It doesn’t out of the box. However, if custom Oracle integration is important, I’d be happy to explore adding that to provide a more turnkey solution for you.”

This angles the conversation from feature curiosity towards commitment and hopefully buying decision. I imply willingness to tailor our offering to win their business. I always try to avoid over-promising. But exploring how to evolve the solution for them pulls us into a partnership mindset. Their needs shape the deal. It is the key to the sharp angle close technique.

Try it – sharp angle questions towards value of your product or service, never pressure; thoughtfully nudging conversations forward wins deals.

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Sales closing techniques 65 of 77:
Similarity Close

Rather than going for a generic sales pitch, I weave in our customer success stories:

“One of our clients is also an insurance company. They use our solution for sales and ABM marketing. After adopting our platform, their customer engagement went up over 200% which resulted in the sales cycle reduction by over 15%.”

Hearing peers overcoming similar struggles builds belief more than hypotheticals. I focus on prospects facing analogous issues vs force-fitting stories.

And I keep it relatable – not just big logos but real people:

“Julia, a Sales Director like yourself, found our coaching helped her sales teams improve conversion rates…”

Of course, I obtain permission before using examples. But strategic stories spark action better than abstract stats.

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Sales closing techniques 66 of 77:
Standing Room Only Close

One of my friends in sales used to emphasize limited availability in order to manufacture a sense of urgency artificially. However, today any savvy decision maker will ignore transparent ploys.

Now he focuses on real value:

“Given the efficiencies, it’s no surprise so many leaders are adopting this approach.”

Rather than pressuring, he conveys gentle thought leadership to encourage prospects:

“More organizations are realizing these capabilities are becoming foundational…”

This implies they may lag behind by delaying adoption. But subtly, via insight, not gimmicks. He also highlights real milestones like deployments reaching scale. Progress compels progress.

Don’t be the boy who cried “limited supply!” Tell compelling customer success stories, and let exclusivity simmer as subtext.

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Sales closing techniques 67 of 77:
Summary Close Technique

I used to just list product features and hope prospects realize and connect the dots on value. Now I take time to spell out product benefits explicitly.

After aligning on prospect’s pain points and goals, I summarize how our solution delivers:

“So to recap, our platform will directly help you reach more potential clients with less effort in a more personalized way. Identify the most engaged prospects and clients with real-time analytics.”

I oftentimes weave in metrics around time savings, sales engagement, revenue gains, etc. to quantify impact of DeckLinks.

The summary close technique ties together how their ideal future state manifests through our platform. I almost narrate them achieving their vision. Of course, I tailor this closely to what we discussed rather than generic messaging. But bringing together the complete picture drives home the scope of value of your product offers. The goal of Summary Close Technique is to make the prospect rethink how good your product is and help the prospect visualize and see a clear picture of why they should move forward with your product or service.

Don’t just present features – summarize how your product or service tackles their priorities comprehensively.

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Sales closing techniques 68 of 77:
Takeaway Close

Rather than pressuring sales tactics, I highly recommend you focus on authentic real time constraints:

“We’re extending a 10% discount on multi-year contracts signed by end of quarter to hit volume targets. But this promotional rate does expire on March 31st.”

As long as I’m transparent that it’s a legit limited-time offer, takeaway close incentivizes action without manipulation.

I stand firm on expiration dates – no last minute concessions undermining credibility. Reasonable scarcity creates real value. The key to the takeaway close is balance – I avoid aggressive urgent sales techniques but do highlight unique opportunities only available for a limited period. Ethical communication earns trust and business long-term.

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Sales closing techniques 69 of 77:
Testimonial Close

Rather than overselling with hype, now I highlight customer success stories:

“Our client increased lead conversion 24% using our sales and marketing collateral engagement analytics. I’m happy to connect you to their Marketing Ops Director Beth to discuss her experience.”

This makes the value of your product tangible vs theoretical. Potential customers put more stock in peers’ validation than sales reps promises. I make sure to feature companies they respect, and get permission before using names. I also thank clients who provide references with small gifts!

Social proof is powerful. But it must be relevant and authentic. Don’t misrepresent customer success stories and partnerships will thrive.

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Sales closing techniques 70 of 77:
Thermometer Close

When hesitant prospects say “I need more time,” I used to just defer and hope they’d come around. But now I politely dig deeper on concerns.

I’ll say: “On a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being completely ready to move forward, where are you now?”

This “temperature check” reveals their positioning. A 7+ means minor issues remain. A 5 or less indicates serious reservations.

I’ll then probe: “What factors are keeping this at a 6 for you right now?”

Thermometer Close uncovers real blockers I can actually address – security fears, budget constraints, etc. I ask open-ended questions and avoid pressuring for a quick answer. But this simple thermometer scale exposes objections that may have simmered silently otherwise.

Measuring readiness more precisely lets me refine my approach to turn 6s into 10s. Small nudge, big impact.

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Sales closing techniques 71 of 77:
Treat Close

Appealing to emotions may seem manipulative. But I’ve learned that done right, it builds rapport. Now if budget owners resist investing in capabilities that would clearly benefit them, I’ll gently say:

“You’ve accomplished so much here sacrificing for the business. Don’t you deserve investing in tools to make your life easier?”

Framing it as a well-earned reward, not a guilty pleasure, can justify value of your product. Especially for founders who pour everything into their company. Of course, I keep it professional – no overly personal matters. But highlighting how they deserve to be the beneficiary too can be persuasive.

With care, rationalizing enjoyment reframes investment in solutions as prudent self-care rather than indulgence.

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Sales closing techniques 72 of 77:
Trial Close

I used to avoid closing questions, worrying they’d seem pushy. But now I sprinkle sales closing questions throughout conversations to gently test if the decision maker is ready to buy. After sharing a capability, I’ll ask conversationally:

“Does this seem like it would achieve that faster reporting you mentioned needing?”

Or when they express interest:

“What factors you think are most appealing to you about this approach?”

I keep it casual – not pressuring them but taking the temperature. Their reactions tell me if we’re aligned or if more discussion is needed. Don’t be afraid to subtly pulse-check understanding. Trial closes give clarity, and clarity builds more deals.

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Sales closing techniques 73 of 77:
Valuable Customer Close

Be very careful with special discounts. Offering a discounted price hastily just to close deals oftentimes leads to devaluing your product or service which erodes perception long term.

Instead, focus on conveying genuine value of your product or service beyond discounted price:

“As one of our top-tier accounts, you’ll have executive-level support and priority on new capabilities as we roll them out.”

Rather than directly focusing on closing the deal, I emphasize partnership perks:

“As an Enterprise plan client, you’ll be first to pilot innovations side-by-side with our product team.”

Positioning them as elite shapes their identity as discerning customers, not bargain hunters. They feel empowered by real status, not artificial sales ploys. Substance sells over tricks. But exclusivity wisely managed is powerful.

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Sales closing techniques 74 of 77:
Visualization Close

Rather than discussing capabilities abstractly, you can help prospects vividly envision using your product or service:

“Imagine finally having real-time visibility into cross-channel campaign performance. How much faster could your team optimize spend and creative?”

Painting a specific vision makes the product benefits tangible. They can picture their future state versus just hearing promises. Descriptive scene-setting primed with value gets prospects excited to realize the vision.

Don’t just discuss features – help hesitant prospects visualize how your product or service positively transforms their workflow. Spark that desire to make the abstract real.

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Sales closing techniques 75 of 77:
Video Close

I used to only follow up via email after meetings. But now I record personalized Video PDF overviews to recap key points using DeckLinks.

Seeing me on-screen again with visuals deepens engagement over a stale email. And I can easily share sales collateral, proposals, sales meeting recaps, onboarding materials, and video responses to questions.

I’ll say: “I wanted to record this quick video to summarize what we discussed and outline next steps…”

It shows I’m willing to invest time beyond a quick note. And being able to pause and reference makes concepts stick better than walls of text. Especially when shared with other decision makers.

Of course, I keep my video-narrated PDFs short and to the point. But well-crafted video closes help seal many deals. Try it!

Back to the Sales Closing Techniques List.

Custom branding
Showcase your brand.
Video narrations
Easily video-narrate sales presentations or proposals when needed (otherwise video is optional). Redo slide if you made a mistake. Use built-in teleprompter to record longer videos.

Data rooms
Attach any supporting files and links. Make it easy for your prospects and clients to find the right information quickly.

Company profiles
Create company profiles with custom banners and info-packages tailored to different industries.
Contact details
Show your contact info easily accessible by your prospects and clients.
Custom CTAs
Add custom CTAs to drive prospects or clients to your calendar, sign up form, etc.
Engagement analytics
See how prospects and clients interact with your PDFs.

Feedback and Reactions
Collect feedback from prospects and clients. Feedback and reactions are not publicly visible.
Share PDFs
Share any existing PDF presentations and documents.
Live links
Share with a single link. Update files even after sharing your link. Get notified when your PDF is viewed. Turn off access anytime.

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Record and share Video PDF presentations and proposals and WOW your prospects and clients with the most personal customer experience. Access engagement analytics. Learn more.

Sales closing techniques 76 of 77:
Ultimatum Close

Avoid high-pressure sales techniques completely. They breed resentment, not loyalty.

If real time constraints like offer expiration dates apply, simply state them as facts without drama:

“Just as a heads up, this pricing does expire at month end when the new rates apply.”

No feigned desperation or fake authority. What’s real wins out. Sometimes reasonable sense of urgency helps ethical sales reps. But substance speaks louder than artificial ultimatums. Progress partnerships through patience and consistency, not ultimatums.

Back to the Sales Closing Techniques List.

Sales closing techniques 77 of 77:
Yes-set Close

Back when I just started in sales, I’d jump right into asking for commitments without laying groundwork. Predictably, I’d often get pushback and “no’s.”

Now I first build agreement through yes-set questions:

“Do you feel this reporting dashboard would provide helpful visibility?”

“Do these video capabilities address your sales and marketing needs?”

“Does the API integration align with your goals to unify your sales stack?”

These incremental alignments make larger commitments feel like a natural progression rather than a leap. I’m always careful with yes-sets – I don’t force agreement on specifics they clearly don’t fully endorse yet. The goal is gradually guiding understanding, not manipulation.

But thoughtful incremental alignment through yes-sets pulls potential customers along the path rather than pushing them. Progress feels cooperative, not confrontational.

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RELATED POST

Master a step-by-step framework to position, pitch, handle objections and close in one call. Shorten sales cycles and exceed targets.

Step-by-Step Sales Closing Process

Closing deals is far from a single moment or canned sales pitch. For top sales professionals, it represents the culmination of a strategic, tailored process crafted over multiple conversations. In this section, we’ll walk through proven steps to advance and close sales without pressure sales techniques. From building rapport early to confirming commitments, learn how each stage sets up closing success.

Step 1: Build rapport early in the sales process.

When I first started out in B2B sales, I’ll admit – I struggled with closing deals. I could build rapport with prospects and discuss different solutions and our product benefits, but often stalled when it came time to seal the deal. Sound familiar?

Early on, I leaned on gimmicky sales tactics out of desperation. The assumptive close, the now-or-never sales pitch, the take-it-or-leave-it ultimatum – I cringe thinking back on some of those calls! But eventually, with the help of some patient mentors, I realized closing deals is more art than science.

What really worked for me was focusing less on tricks and more on trust. I started truly listening to prospects’ needs. I learned to take sales objections not as rejections, but as opportunities to reassure. I gave prospects space rather than forcing timelines.

And I began closing more deals. Not with high-pressure sales techniques, but by guiding prospects to natural, logical next steps. Building confidence in the value I offered. Moving forward together, not pushing them into it.

So don’t sweat the buzzwords or slimy sales stereotypes. Stick to principles that help potential customers, like I wish I had earlier on. If you focus on serving others with compassion, more deals will follow.

You can get everything in life you want if you will just help enough other people get what they want.

Step 2. Ask trial probing questions throughout to gauge potential customers interest.

Seasoned B2B sales reps know the value of asking trial probing questions throughout the entire sales cycle. These are probing questions that nudge the prospect closer to a buying decision without forcing a hard close prematurely.

Trial closes help uncover concerns early, assess where the prospect is mentally, and gradually build commitment over time. I like to think of them as taking the prospect’s temperature. You get critical insights without putting them on the spot with a high-pressure ask.

Some examples that have worked for me:

“Based on our discussion so far, do you feel this solution could be a fit for your needs?”

“Is there anything major standing in the way of moving forward at this stage?”

“How does this proposal line up with your initial vision?”

“If we can address your concerns around [X], does this seem like a viable option?”

The key is keeping them conversational. I don’t read word-for-word scripts. I simply listen closely to the prospect and ask relevant probing questions once we establish rapport.

Over the years, I’ve learned to pay attention not just to the actual responses, but to tone, energy level, body language. Often what isn’t said directly speaks volumes. You get a sixth sense for reading between the lines.

But don’t worry, that comes with time and experience. For now focus on weaving in strategic trial closes at key points. It will help ensure you’re not wasting time on more deals going nowhere while building winnable opportunities.

Step 3: Address objections to build trust and reassure potential customer.

Early in my B2B sales career, I’ll admit – I did not handle sales objections well. I took them personally, got defensive, and tended to overpromise in order to avoid hearing concerns. This only damaged trust and cost me business.

With experience, I’ve learned to see sales objections as pivotal moments to demonstrate credibility and understanding. When thoughtfully addressed, sales objections present an opportunity to strengthen the relationship.

Now when sales objections come up, I make sure to:

  • Let the prospect voice their objection fully.
  • Don’t interrupt them.
  • Acknowledge the objection in a way that shows you take it seriously.
  • Rephrase the sales objection in a more positive light. Position yourself as an advocate seeking solutions.
  • Provide just enough information – data, examples, process details – to reasonably address the root concern.
  • Confirm the objection has been resolved to the prospect’s satisfaction before moving the deal forward.

During a long sales cycle with a potential client, we uncovered concerns around migration downtime. Rather than pushing back, I listened closely and walked through how we planned each stage of their rollout to minimize disruption. This tailored approach resolved the sales objection and built significant trust that ultimately won the deal.

Sales objections show the prospect is engaged. Handled with care and wisdom, you can gain credibility and upper hand, reassure doubts, and advance the sale. With experience, you learn to proactively uncover concerns early and turn them into mutual understanding.

Struggling with Sales Objections? Let ChatGPT Help You Close More Deals

Sales objections shouldn’t stop you from closing the deal. With ChatGPT, you can get quick and effective responses to handle any sales objection. Read the article.

Step 4. Identify and appeal to prospect's problems and motivations.

Over the years in B2B sales, I’ve learned that appealing to a prospect’s problems and core motivations is far more effective than any generic sales pitch. Taking the time to understand what truly drives prospects sets you up for a much higher close rate.

During initial conversations, I pay close attention to the prospect’s problems and goals they describe. I ask open-ended probing questions to uncover their underlying needs. Is it cost savings? Growth? Competitive advantage? Improved customer experience? Risk reduction?

Once I believe I know prospect’s problems and main motivators, I weave relevant messaging and examples into my sales pitch. Rather than regurgitating generic features, I tailor my solution to align clearly with their key drivers.

For example, if I sense flexibility is important, I’ll focus on customization options and scalability. If security is critical, I’ll emphasize our protocols and protections. I frame our offerings in terms of how we uniquely address their priorities.

This tailored approach also helps me address objections more effectively later on. I can reframe obstacles by linking directly back to their core motivations. Reminding prospects of the ultimate vision makes them more receptive to reasonable solutions.

Understanding and appealing to motivations shows I’m focused on their specific business goals, not just making a sale. This builds trust and credibility and shows I’m invested in the customer success. It enables me to guide the decision maker to say yes as a natural progression, not a high-pressure push.

Step 5: Give potential customer clear call to action when ready to close.

Once I feel a prospect is fully aligned and ready to move the deal forward, I transition to a clear call-to-action close. This could be requesting a next sales meeting, a proposal review, a contract, or simply asking for the business directly.

I avoid ambiguous sales closing techniques that beat around the bush. After I build rapport, align on needs, and address objections and prospect’s pain points, I clearly yet tactfully ask for commitment.

Some examples of direct yet friendly calls to action that have worked for me:

  • “Shall we schedule a call to review the proposal together and finalize next steps?”
  • “What do we need to do together to make this official?”
  • “It seems like everything is in order. Are you ready to get started on this project with us?”
  • “We’re on the same page and ready to roll. Shall I send over the paperwork today for e-signature and get this ball officially rolling?”

The key is being direct without seeming overly pushy or aggressive. I maintain a helpful, consultative tone.

And importantly, I provide a clear path for the prospect to take action. I end with next steps, not just a vague question. This makes it easier for busy prospects to commit while their interest is peaked.

Step 6. Confirm commitment and next steps.

Closing the deal is great, but the work doesn’t stop there – far from it. I’ve learned the hard way that you need to nail down the specifics of what was agreed to avoid misunderstandings.

For example, I once had a prospect enthusiastically say “Absolutely, let’s move the deal forward!” on a call. But when I circled back with paperwork a week later, he was surprised by the terms. Turns out we hadn’t fully synced up on expectations.

Now when I close, I make sure to confirm:

  • The specific package being purchased
  • Pricing, contract length, and payment terms
  • Onboarding plan and timeline
  • Points of contact for implementation
  • Process for moving forward with paperwork

I’ll say something like “Just to make sure I have this right, we agreed on the Enterprise Plan (Package B) for 12 months at $X with payment upfront, and I’ll get the contract over today so we can kick off training next week?”

Getting verbal confirmation on the major specifics prevents backtracking later. I’ll also follow up with a recap email outlining what we covered.

It may seem tedious, but confirming key details and next steps leaves no room for miscommunication once that initial excitement of closing fades. It ensures no unexpected hurdles derail a done deal.

When sending recaps or proposals I highly highly recommend using DeckLinks. DeckLinks allows B2B sales reps video narrate their presentations or proposals, attach any supporting documents, and share everything in a single trackable link. This way you can be sure that nothing gets lost in translation and you will get access to granular engagement analytics!