The Best Sales Books For Savage Sales Professionals – RATED

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In this list I’ve rated the best sales books to equip you sales rep savages with the knowledge to become unstoppable sales leaders. I’ve gone through quite a few “sales books”, and to be completely honest, most of them were … meh. Just the same old common sense sales “tactics” wrapped up in a shiny new box trying to pass itself off as some revolutionary sales methodology.

That’s why I’ve put together my definitive list of must-read sales books for savage sales professionals. Those money-hungry wolves. The ones who will do whatever it takes to literally drag prospects across the finish line, close deals, get that commission, and blast past their sales quota. Even if it means resorting to primal sales tactics that’d make a used car salesman blush. Scary imagery, I know!

That’s not to say that these sales books have no flaws. Oh trust me, they do! But look, even the best selling books aren’t perfect. Many of them got enough sales guru pep talk to make you feel like Andy Dufresne swimming through a 500-yard sewage pipe just to escape to the other side. Spoiler alert! That “sales closer philosopher’s stone” you think is waiting for you at the end of that tunnel ain’t nothing but a crusty turd. It’s just more sales guru gobbledygook. I’ve done the heavy lifting to cut through the BS and yank out the “golden” nuggets so you don’t have to!

Oh and I’ll be rating each of these best selling books on a SALES SAVAGERY SCALE from 1 to 10! So without further ado, here’s my list of the best sales books for savage sales professionals.

#22. "The Greatest Salesman in the World" by Og Mandino.

The Greatest Salesman in the World - sales book by Og Mandino

Sales savagery score 3/10

Mandino’s book is like a sales LSD trip. It’s colorful, confusing, and makes you question your reality.

Forget those dry sales books cramming tactics down your throat. “The Greatest Salesman in the World” by Og Mandino is part wisdom manifesto, part mind-bending sales story.

Instead of dry sales tactics for closing deals, Mandino takes a different approach and spins a wild story about a broke salesman who discovers secret scrolls. These scrolls lay out ten powerful principles for unleashing your inner sales leader through sheer positive habits and mindset shift.

I know what you’re thinking “Please, not another self-help sales book!” But stick with me for a sec. Mandino’s manuscript is a clever allegory that low-key packs a TON of practical insights. Mantras along the lines of “failing constantly is the prerequisite for success” and “greet this priceless new day with love” are the kind of chicken soup for the sales managers soul many need sometimes.

The mythical storytelling frame gets pretty cheesy at times though. The endless religious overtones become downright cringeworthy at times. And some self-helpy lines like “I will persist until I succeed” could make you hurl. But there’s an oddly compelling simplicity to Mandino’s sales philosophy that kept me hooked. It’s like Mandino GETS the psychological warfare us sales executives wage daily.

Sure, some of the lingo like “I will multiply my value a hundredfold” might make you cringe a bit. But that’s kinda the beauty. You’ll notice that Mandino sugarcoats some brilliant success principles with just enough humble brag to keep you engaged.

While certainly impactful as a motivator, “The Greatest Salesman” is kinda devoid of any tangible sales strategies or tactical frameworks if you ask me. Experienced business development executives will probably get frustrated by this sales books self-help generalities.

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#21. "The Transparency Sale" by Todd Caponi.

The Transparency Sale - How Unexpected Honesty and Understanding the Buying Brain Can Transform Your Results - sales book by Todd Caponi

Sales savagery score 3/10

Give them the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly right from the start and see what sticks.”

Todd Caponi’s “The Transparency Sale” is the brutally honest talk many sales professionals need to start closing more deals through authenticity.

Caponi goes ham on those traditional sales tactics that show insincerity. His core philosophy screams ditch the phony posturing and just lay out all your product’s flaws upfront. Yeah, that may sound crazy but Caponi’s research revealed that prospects inherently distrust perfect 5-star ratings anyway.

What really separates this piece from other generic sales books in my opinion is Caponi’s emphasis on using transparency to build trust at every stage of the sales process. He puts a very strong emphasis on tactical sales strategies like seamlessly admitting weaknesses in emails right away, handling objections head-on, and positioning your offering’s gaps as irrelevant.

He frames transparency as the ultimate buyer psychology lifehack. Acknowledge your flaws first and you instantly disarm a prospect’s suspicion radar AND connect on a human level. Todd cites neuroscience proving our “feeling” brain craves authenticity over pure rationality. Yay, science!

However, I think the potential downside here is Caponi’s system may not apply perfectly to complex enterprise sales situations. But for sales professionals focusing on smaller size deals, “The Transparency Sale” offers good sales strategies, valuable insights, and tactics.

Also, while filled with convictional case studies, Caponi’s sales book is surprisingly light on specific, repeatable sales frameworks. Aside from some high-level scripts for flaw-admission emails, he lacks tactical sales playbooks for methodically implementing transparency at scale.

In my opinion, Caponi’s practical advice on building trust, combating skepticism, and delivering genuine value is pretty darn good. It is especially useful for the consultative sales professional launching basic outreach cadences. Just don’t delude yourself into viewing transparency as a panacea.

#20. "To Sell Is Human" by Daniel H. Pink.

To Sell Is Human - The Surprising Truth About Moving Others - sales book by Daniel H Pink

Sales savagery score 3/10

For salespeople who want to take a philosophy class instead of making a sale.

Dan Pink’s “To Sell Is Human” has been making waves recently on LinkedIn. So let’s start with the good: Pink’s overarching thesis that we’re all “non-sales sellers” in today’s world rings true. Whether you’re a lawyer, teacher, or even an Uber driver, the ability to move people and “sell” your ideas is crucial.

Where Pink gets my respect though is revamping those dusty tired old sales rules we’ve all heard too much. Instead of “ABC – Always Be Closing”, he says smart sales reps need “Attunement, Buoyancy and Clarity” to really succeed. Kinda refreshing to see someone challenge traditionally accepted sales wisdom, ya know?

The guy did his primary research too, sprinkling the book with some case studies and real-world examples to illustrate his points. I also dig his valuable insights into “perspective taking” versus just empathy for better sales conversations. And his take on improvisation skills for “spur-of-the-moment selling situations”? That’s just solid practical advice.

But here’s where I start taking issue though, Pink never actually shares any step-by-step proven strategies. Sure, this sales book is littered with little exercises to try. But c’mon, I need more than just hypotheticals on “insight” selling to take my sales game to the next level.

Then you got weird tangents like Pink rambling about how “ambiverts” (a person who has features of both an introvert and an extrovert) are supposedly the best salespeople now.

In my opinion, “To Sell Is Human” is a fairly engaging read from an outsider’s perspective. It’ll make you rethink your assumptions about what selling really means these days. But if you’re a hungry sales manager looking for a comprehensive guide to up your sales volume? You’re probably better off sticking to the true sales book classics written by sales leaders who have actually lived the sales grind. It’s still a decent read though.

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#19. "New Sales. Simplified." by Mike Weinberg.

New Sales, Simplified - The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development - sales book by Mike Weinberg

Sales savagery score 4/10

For those who believe “zero Fs given” is a valid sales strategy.

In this book, Weinberg calls out exactly why so many sales organizations are flailing at prospecting: We’re wasting top hunters on account management work while delusionally hoping the “farmers” will miraculously bring in new business. 

Weinberg’s “no-BS framework” breaks down business development into three critical components: 1) ruthlessly targeting the right prospects, 2) crafting a killer sales story, and 3) methodically executing your outbound sales process. Weinberg’s zero Fs given attitude towards blunt truth-telling is refreshing.

What sets this sales book apart the most to me is the granular, step-by-step detail he provides for each component. Need a banger cold call script that doesn’t make you sound like a used-car dealer Weinberg’s got you. Struggle to close deals because your presentations ramble worse than a drunken auctioneer? He’ll fix that too!

I have to admit that Weinberg can come across a tad arrogant at times. Dropping luxury jet anecdotes and what not. However, for any veteran sales professional already consistently pumping out new logos, much of “Simplified” will feel rudimentary, in my opinion. Weinberg’s observations about separating hunters/farmers, while directionally great, lack tactical depth beyond the obvious.

However, one massive blindspot is Weinberg’s utter disregard for social selling. His social media coaching is essentially “get on Twitter and blog”. Okay!

#18. "How I Raised Myself from Failure to Success in Selling" by Frank Bettger.

How I Raised Myself from Failure to Success in Selling - sales book by Frank Bettger

Sales savagery score 4/10

Proof that a little manipulation and a lot of enthusiasm can go a long way in the wrong direction.

Frank Bettger’s book has built quite a cult following. It’s a very very old sales book, originally published in 1947. It is the oldest book on this list by far. BUT Bettger’s core philosophies around cultivating “infectious enthusiasm” and uncovering target audience deeper “real reasons” for purchasing feel surprisingly ahead of their time. Heck, Bettger’s keen insights into optimizing sales cycles efficiencies by scrutinizing call data feel profoundly prophetic. His ruthless auditing of wasted efforts remarkably anticipated future analytics obsessions.

But much of “How I Raised Myself” comes laced with jaw-droppingly musty tactics better suited for pedaling 1930s snake oil than crafting modern deals. Bettger’s glorification of manipulative fear-mongering to “instill doubt” in prospects is downright sociopathic.

Worse, the endless parade of corny anecdotes describing Bettger’s door-to-door life insurance hustle quickly descends into cringe-worthy sales strategies. His flimsy frameworks remain painfully one-dimensional to my taste. Despite its enduring reputation, Bettger’s motivational rants are hilariously dated and severely lacking in tactical depth in my opinion.

If you really wanna give this sales book a read make sure to filter out the putrid manipulation toward more ethical, consultative sales practices. I think his “success” formula is a bit ill-equipped for our modern sales processes and Internet marketing landscape. This sales book is still worth reading though.

#17. "SPIN Selling" by Neil Rackham.

SPIN Selling - sales book by Neil Rackham

Sales savagery score 5/10

For those who think the way to a sale is through a maze of questions, dead ends, and maybe a little confusion.

The classic sales book that I just had to include in this best sales books list. Still regarded by many as top sales leader playbook of all times. Rackham’s sales book focuses on prioritizing discovery over premature “solution demonstrations”. It does provide solid practical advice for sales leaders. His sales leader playbook for advancing sales through casual commitments is also on-point in my opinion.

But let’s keep it real though. Many sales professionals I’ve talked to label Rackham’s sales process as outdated and manipulative, especially with today’s emphasis on authenticity. Some jaded sales reps outright mock “SPIN Selling” as a hacky script for duping naive prospects.

Sure, there’s validity to both sides. However, I think his overly technical question-grilling may be a poor fit for many modern sales cycles prizing Internet marketing, patience, and trust-building.

Additionally, this sales book has a shocking lack of actionable tips on opening and closing deals. Rackham blowing an entire chapter dismissing closers, while skimping on what real sales reps SHOULD do, is an oversight in my opinion.

Still Rackham’s sales game is undeniable. Sustainable sales success starts from methodical buyer psychology discovery. Not mindless product recitation.

#16. "The Psychology of Selling" by Brian Tracy.

The Psychology of Selling - Increase Your Sales Faster and Easier Than You Ever Thought Possible - sales book by Brian Tracy

Sales savagery score 5/10

For those who believe in targeting “non-customers” because your real customers just aren’t enough work.

Tracy clearly knows his stuff when it comes to the sales process. In this sales book, he breaks down the psychology behind closing from building rapport and handling objections, solution selling, to negotiating and following up. There’s some solid sales wisdom in this book on developing the right mindset and habits.

Where Tracy really shines though is rooting everything in real-world examples and proven sales strategies. Like explaining how the top 20% of sales reps generate 80% of sales organization’ revenue by mastering certain principles. Or his section on “knowing your competitive advantage” to position yourself as the only logical choice.

Still, I feel like a lot of his advice feels outdated a bit and lacking any real nuance. Stuff like pushing the importance of dressing to impress. Or his tips to avoid entire types of sales conversations if your product isn’t a clear market leader. C’mon, any hungry salesperson knows we gotta hustle regardless.

Then you get some real head-scratchers like his suggestion to relentlessly target “non-customers” who initially have zero need for your product. What? Sure, generating new demand is great. But his zero examples on actually executing this “revolutionary” idea feels half-baked in my opinion.

That being said, I think “The Psychology of Selling” is a mostly solid sales guide built around Tracy’s experience. Is it the perfect bible for modern selling? I doubt it. But I think even successful salespeople can still find some useful psychological tactics in this book to up their sales game, even if a lot of the examples feel dated.

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#15. "The Sales Acceleration Formula" by Mark Roberge.

The Sales Acceleration Formula - Using Data, Technology, and Inbound Selling to go from $0 to $100 Million - sales book by Mark Roberge

Sales savagery score 5/10

Where engineering and sales teams shake hands and pretend they know what they’re doing together.

Mark Roberge was HubSpot’s sales leader and Chief Revenue Officer of their Sales Division. This guy literally engineered their entire sales process from the ground up. Currently, Mark serves as an Advisor at HubSpot.

I gotta respect Mark’s transparency on the specific proven strategies and real world examples he shares in this sales book. Literally the ones he used to drive HubSpot’s sales success. In his sales book he goes in-depth on tangible sales methodologies like his approach to competency-based hiring, consistent sales training, sales management accountability, and demand generation. Not some vague “8 Mindset Shifts of a Sales Ninja” nonsense.

What’s crazy though is Roberge came from an engineering background, not sales! This let him take a fresh, data-driven perspective to rethinking every aspect of the sales process. His sales cycle acceleration formula is basically quantifying and optimizing each part of the sales engine through testing and primary research.

Now, I’m not gonna deny that some of the core concepts he builds on are sales basics for many experienced sales managers. But the real value is seeing how Roberge integrated it all into a unified, scalable RevOps engine tailored to HubSpot’s sales organization. He gives you the full step-by-step process behind sales tactics like “insight selling” rather than just rote memorization of a pitch deck.

That said, Roberge is upfront that his specific strategies may not necessarily translate to other sales models beyond HubSpot’s sales success. If your sales team is doing outbound field sales to whales rather than inbound lead nurturing, then yeah, parts of his formula probably won’t apply.

But what does translate really well to me personally is Roberge’s inbound sellers mindset and first principles thinking. Stuff like baking your sales methodology right into the buyer’s journey, using primary research coupled with data to identify top performing salespeople traits for hiring, and always quantifying results to iterate on the sales processes further.

In a nutshell, “The Sales Acceleration Formula” is a Chief Sales Officer underdog story of an outsider using metrics and first principles to disrupt the sales world. I’ve read this sales book a few times and every time I come back I find something new!

#14. "Fanatical Prospecting" by Jeb Blount.

Fanatical Prospecting - The Ultimate Guide to Opening Sales Conversations and Filling the Pipeline by Leveraging Social Selling, Telephone, Email, Text, and Cold Calling - sales book by Jeb Blount

Sales savagery score 6/10

The handbook for masochists who can’t get enough rejection in their daily lives.

Jeb Blount’s sales book may be the holy grail for anyone struggling with the soul-crushing slog of prospecting and closing deals.

Prospecting is a “rejection-dense” nightmare. But it’s also the price you pay for those tasty commission checks. No prospecting = no selling. Period.

Blount doesn’t just unload a firehose of manipulative closing tactics. He breaks down a simple, sustainable outbound sales process built on discipline and self-awareness. Jeb lays out his “30-Day Rule”, skip prospecting this month and your pipeline will be a barren wasteland 90 days later. I can personally attest to that and I’m sure most sales managers too!

He drives home the importance of separating those emotionally-detached winners from the desperate sales professionals stinking of failure. Because prospects can literally smell desperation and will run for the hills.

For me, what really sets “Fanatical Prospecting” apart from the usual “rah-rah, get on the phones!” pep-rally sales books are Blount’s practical insights into the psychology of prospecting successfully. Like using a prospect’s name as a “mental hack” to grab their attention. Or asking thought-provoking questions to uncover their pain points.

Not only that but the man is rallying sales professionals to ditch the “social selling” pipe dream. In my opinion, his utter lack of empathy for the modern buyer experience feels downright sociopathic at times.

Now, I’ll be honest, some of Blount’s tough-love, no-BS advice can sting a bit. He pulls exactly zero punches calling out self-sabotaging mediocrity and lack of discipline. But to me that’s kind of the beauty of this sales book’s simple, back-to-basics sales philosophy.

#13. "Smart Calling" by Art Sobczak.

Smart Calling - Eliminate the Fear, Failure, and Rejection from Cold Calling - sales book by Art Sobczak

Sales savagery score 6/10

This sales book teaches you to cold call strangers with confidence and only a hint of awkward desperation.

Most of you are probably dreading cold calling like it’s a root canal. I do! The fear of rejection. Wrestling with the gatekeepers. Feeling like a sleazy telemarketer. Making those outbound calls can be brutal! And to be completely frank, I’m still not a big fan of cold calls either. But before you completely ditch cold calling, you need to check out Art Sobczak’s “Smart Calling”.

In this sales book, Sobczak teaches you through getting over your “cold calling phobia”. No fluff. Just a straightforward process to start dialing confidently.

It seems like he’s got scripts to disarm even the most miserly gatekeeper. His methods for quickly identifying decision makers and setting appointments will be total game-changers for some sales professionals. He focuses on earning attention first rather than just spamming dials.

Sobczak goes ham with his main point that you ain’t owed jack until delivering real value upfront. It’s a brutal but profound sales mindset. And it makes sense. He’ll also call out self-sabotaging habits like thoughtless email blasts or that soul-crushing “reject me till they accept me” mentality. He forces account executives to raise their standards.

Now, is this the perfect cold calling sales book? Yes and No. Some sections on data and tech are pretty dated. And you’ll have to get scrappy filling in your own industry sales scripts. But at its core, “Smart Calling” cleans out the bad habits and equips you with a great cold calling sales strategy. Despite its flaws, in my view, it’s still one of the best sales books on cold calls out there.

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#12. "The Challenger Sale" by Matthew Dixon and Brent Adamson.

The Challenger Sale - Taking Control of the Customer Conversation - sales book by Matthew Dixon and Brent Adamson

Sales savagery score 6/10

The sales book that wants you to boss around your customers and call it “insisted consideration.”

Just like “Spin Selling” by Neil Rackham, “The Challenger Sale” by Dixon and Adamson is one of the best sales books classics. You’ll find it in most top sales leader playbook lists. “The Challenger Sale” is also one of the sales managers all time favorite sales books from what I’ve noticed. And after reading it, I can understand why.

The core take is solid but it has some flaws that I’ll discuss later. Matthew and Brent’s main premise is that the classic long-term customer relationships builder sales rep is officially EXTINCT in today’s B2B sales landscape. Instead, they propose a new type of sales reps that they call “Challengers”. Sales professionals obsessed with teaching prospects new perspectives.

This “Challenger” philosophy of disruptive thinking and controlling conversations in theory is powerful when executed perfectly. Their tactics for developing unique insights, tailoring messaging, and fearlessly pushing prospects towards “insisted consideration” make sense.

But here’s the cold hard truth though: to me, much of “The Challenger Sale” feels like repackaged common sense dressed up as groundbreaking sales methodology. Their continuously arguing that relationships don’t matter is complete nonsense.

Essentially, the main point of this sales book is that the best deal closers create constructive tension by revolutionizing how prospects think. It is strong but they position it as some profound new paradigm, rather than recognizing it as one potent tool in the sales playbook. To me, it’s a bit useless without the fundamentals of rapport building, buyer discovery, empathy, and authenticity.

#11. "The Only Sales Guide You'll Ever Need" by Anthony Iannarino.

The Only Sales Guide You'll Ever Need - sales book by Anthony Iannarino

Sales savagery score 6/10

This sales book is one part practical advice, two parts rah-rah speeches, and a dash of high-level fluff you may or may not already know.

The first half of “The Only Sales Guide You’ll Ever Need” is dedicated to drilling home the crucial mindset and psychological tactics that separate real sales winners from the rest. Self-discipline, optimism, and accountability.

You’re probably thinking “Heyyy, I’ve heard all this soft skill fluff before.” But I must say this sales book goes a little bit deeper. Anthony breaks each characteristic down with clarity. Mixing in real-world examples of why mastering these mindsets is so pivotal to sales success.

What really sets this book apart though is Iannarino’s emphasis on higher-level sales competencies often glossed over. Stuff like developing business acumen to consult at a deeper level. Or his section on change management to ensure your solutions actually get implemented and create value.

Now, does “The Only Sales Guide You’ll Ever Need” perfectly live up to its ambitious title? Of course not. No single sales book could ever cover everything you need. But, in my opinion, Iannarino’s guide is about as comprehensive guide as they come in terms of fusing the psychological, strategic, and practical elements of real selling. And it rightly deserves its place on this list of the best sales books.

Iannarino does veer into rah-rah mode every now and then with all his pep talks on “Being a Leader” and such. But overall, I think this 360-degree guide is a must-have for any sales professional who wants to build a successful sales career.

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#10. "Sell or Be Sold" by Grant Cardone.

Sell or Be Sold - How to Get Your Way in Business and in Life - sales book by Grant Cardone

Sales savagery score 7/10

A sales book for people who dream of living in a world where sales is a contact sport and morals are just another line item in the budget.

Grant Cardone’s “Sell or Be Sold” is somewhat of warning we all need that life is … SALES. Of course! “To Sell Is Human” by Daniel Pink anyone? From scoring that hot date to landing your dream job, you’re always selling something. I mean, if you think about it, he’s kinda right.

Cardone pounds it right away that we’re all salespeople, whether we realize it or not. Grant has some sales cred, clawing his way up from selling cars to running a real estate empire. 

In this sales book he breaks down his sales process into five steps. But the real moneymaker is his valuable insights into the buyer psychology. Cardone shows you the tactics his sales team uses to crawl inside potential customers heads using “people knowledge”.

And you know what’s the ballsiest part? His tips for grabbing attention in today’s highly distracted world. Cardone says if you’re not drawing your target audience, even haters, with your shameless self-promotion, you’re doing it wrong.

Cardone can get a bit preachy though and salesy at times. No surprise there. And some of his sales tactics for bulldozing sales objections might cross a few ethical lines. But hey, the guy doesn’t mess around.

If you’re sick of being a doormat and want to start bringing more business, get “Sell or Be Sold.” Just be ready for Cardone to “kick you in the teeth” until you start taking action.

#9. "Gap Selling" by Keenan.

Gap Selling Getting the Customer to Yes - sales book by Keenan

Sales savagery score 7/10

Keenan’s book is all about the gap between where your prospect is and where they want to be. Kind of like the gap between your paycheck and your bills.

Keenan goes ham on those traditional sales tactics many sales professionals have been brainwashed to follow. Keenan calls BS on mindlessly probing for customer needs they can’t fully conceptualize themselves. Slick product demos? Not happening if you haven’t first uncovered their burning pain points and desired future state.

The real sales methodology gem Keenan shares in his sales book is understanding the “gap”. The gap between where your prospect is now and where they dream to be. Only by really understanding those depths can you position your product as the must have gap closer.

This shift doesn’t come easy. Keenan makes you work for it by relentlessly driving home growth mindset changes. Like accepting your prospect likely has zero clue what they really want. Or realizing every sale is an emotional powder keg of change resistance.

Keenan’s tough-love rants can feel preachy and the sales book is admittedly repetitive in pushing his core concepts. And if you’re going after recurring deals with longtime customers, his “one-and-done” sales approach and philosophy might feel limiting to say the least.

To be completely honest though, much of “Gap Selling” feels like recycled common sense dressed up as a profound new doctrine. Keenan’s claims that “all sales are about change” and uncovering “intrinsic motivations” isn’t particularly revolutionary.

Also, “Gap Selling” is shockingly light on specific, repeatable sales frameworks. Aside from some retrospective deal breakdowns, Keenan provides minimal tactical sales playbooks for systematizing his sales methodologies. Still “Gap Selling” by Keenan is still one of the best selling books out there, and it deserves the spot on this best sales books list.

#8. "Never Split the Difference" by Chris Voss.

Never Split the Difference - Negotiating As If Your Life Depended On It - sales book by Chris Voss

Sales savagery score 7/10

If you ever wanted to sound smart while asking obvious questions, this book will teach you how to leave your opponent wondering which way is up.

I’m sure many of you have heard about this book. But did you know that Chris Voss isn’t your typical “local sales guru” teaching fluff seminars on “closing billionaires” over at the Morton’s? Voss is a literal former FBI hostage negotiator.

The real power of this “sales book” is that Voss just demolishing conventional wisdom many sales reps have been conditioned to accept. All that “win-win” and “compromise to make the deal” nonsense? Chris says it’s terrible advice that undercuts your leverage. To him “no deal is better than a bad deal.”

What really hits different though is his emphasis on tactical verbal strategies and psychological tactics to control the “sales conversation”. Using “calibrated questions” to probe the other side’s mindset. Subtly “labeling” emotions to establish rapport. Deploying “forced empathy” instead of that wishy-washy “perspective taking” crap.

Now, I have to be honest with you, some of this stuff feels like mental gymnastics or jiujitsu pulled straight outta a CIA manual. Heck, even Voss cops to using these same techniques back in his glory days. So if you’re not ready to get your hands a little dirty, this approach may rub you the wrong way!

But if you’re a hungry sales manager, this book could be a goldmine for you. And while some of the role-play examples feel corny, they take home Voss’ philosophies in an easy-to-digest way.

One of my gripes though, I don’t buy Voss’ whole “everybody’s a negotiator nowadays” schtick he leans on heavily. Like yeah, I get negotiating with my wife is technically “trading value.” But c’mon, trying to equate chores with hostage crises feels like a reach.

But I digress. At the end of the day, I still think that “Never Split the Difference” is a great read for any sales professional looking to improve their negotiating skills. This sales book will shake up your perspective and equip you with psychological tactics to “win” more deals.

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#7. "Little Red Book of Selling" by Jeffrey Gitomer.

The Little Red Book of Selling - 12 5 Principles of Sales Greatness sales book by Jeffrey Gitomer

Sales savagery score 7/10

Gitomer gives you a friendly pat on the back while also reminding you that if you don’t sell, you won’t eat.

Gitomer’s conversational writing style and playful visuals give the “Little Red Book of Selling” a refreshing vibe. That said, Gitomer hits you with some harsh realities about the sales profession too. He goes ham explaining that success in sales career ultimately rides on YOUR mindset, drive, and self-discipline. Sounds familiar?

In the “Little Red Book of Selling” you’ll find plenty of street-savvy action steps and verbal tactics to immediately apply. However beyond those basics, the advice doesn’t really ascend to the “greatness” promised on the cover. The “Little Red Book of Selling” leans more motivational than revealing any breakthrough sales methodologies.

But at the end of the day, I still think the “Little Red Book of Selling” is a decent read for most sales professionals. Just don’t expect it to reinvent the wheel with innovative sales strategies. Is it refreshing? I guess. Revolutionary? Eh, not quite. But still a worthy read.

#6. "High-Profit Prospecting" by Mark Hunter.

High-Profit Prospecting - Powerful Strategies to Find the Best Leads and Drive Breakthrough Sales Results - sales book by Mark Hunter

Sales savagery score 7/10

Hunter’s book takes aim at the “always be helping” crowd and hits them where it hurts. Right in the missed sales quotas.

Look, I ain’t gonna sugarcoat this, most of these “sales guru” and sales management books are full of fluff and hot air. But Mark Hunter’s “High-Profit Prospecting” has some real substance.

In this book Hunter calls out all the BS myths peddled by these self-proclaimed “experts” and “gurus” who’ve probably never even picked up a phone to make a real sales call. Stuff like “prospecting is dead” or “just do social selling and the leads will magically appear.” Please! We all know finding quality prospects is the lifeblood of any sales approach.

The real meat of this sales book is in the practical strategies Hunter lays out. He doesn’t just spew theoretical mumbo-jumbo. He gives you actual scripts, email templates, and step-by-step plays you can run right away. Stuff like his “7 Strategic Questions” to laser-focus your prospecting efforts or his tactics for getting past gatekeepers to reach the decision-makers.

Now, don’t get me wrong, some of the basics he covers like “have a dedicated prospecting time” are pretty rudimentary. But where Hunter’s sales book really make sense is calling out contrarian truths that go against conventional sales wisdom. Like how your prospects honestly don’t give a rat’s ass about you or your company at first. The guy is a savage! Or how social selling alone ain’t gonna cut it. You need a multi-channel sales approach.

One of the most entertaining parts of this sales book is his rant about how we’ve been brainwashed into thinking sharing is caring and we should bend over backwards to “add value” through our content. He suggests that you as a sales professional should start by figuring out what YOU would actually buy from yourself! I think it’s a great counterpoint to all the mushy “always be helping” dogma out there.

Now, is this book the be-all and end-all of sales prospecting? Of course not. Hunter admits he doesn’t have all the answers and this is just his philosophical approach that’s worked for him.

#5. "Secrets of a Master Closer" by Mike Kaplan.

Secrets of a Master Closer - A Simpler, Easier, And Faster Way To Sell Anything To Anyone, Anytime, Anywhere - sales book by Mike Kaplan

Sales savagery score 8/10

This sales book will teach you how to close deals with the subtlety of a back-alley dealer. It’s also got enough bite to handle objections and enough cheese to choke a rat.

In this sales book Kaplan lays out a systematic 8-step roadmap to sealing the deal every time. None of that rah-rah “ALWAYS BE CLOSING!” nonsense either. We’re talking a systematic step-by-step process built on fundamentals like actually listening to your prospect and uncovering their pain points.

The real secrets come from Kaplan’s valuable insights into the buyer psychology game. Mike breaks down how to smoothly handle objections. Get that all-important head nod and position yourself as the likable trusted advisor.  

What sets this sales book apart for me is how digestible Kaplan makes it all. The examples and role-playing exercises allow even the new sales reps to master the sales closing techniques. Kaplan’s nice-guy approach and straight talk are a refreshing change from those intense Wolf of Wall Street types too.

While it’s a good read, I have to mention that for enterprise sales executives selling $50K+ deals, this sales book might be too too basic. But for most sales professionals with average deals in the high teens and lower, Kaplan’s “Secrets” could be an absolute sales game-changer.

Despite its shiny packaging, some of Kaplan’s advice feels unforgivably outdated and amateurish though. One of the unethical tactics Kaplan promotes is essentially lying to gatekeepers to get past them and reach the decision maker. His robotic suggestion replies along the lines of “Oh wow, amazing!” remind me of sleazy boiler room hustling.

Some of his cheesy scripts that promote hard-closing pressure and manipulation almost guaranteed to enrage many modern buyers, in my opinion.

#4. "How to Master the Art of Selling" by Tom Hopkins.

How to Master the Art of Selling - sales book by Tom Hopkins

Sales savagery score 8/10

Hopkins shows you how to sell with the finesse of a bull in a China Shop and the enthusiasm of a used car salesman at the end of the month. It will either leave you closing deals or questioning your life choices.

You can tell Hopkins is an old-school grinder who spent decades in sales. He doesn’t beat around the bush with vague “abundance mindset” stuff. “How to Master the Art of Selling” is full of practical sales methodologies, techniques, sales scripts, and playbooks.

The real meat lies in Hopkins’ obsessive explore of every facet of the sales cycle. From prospecting and pitching, to handling objections and closing. Each chapter breaks down specific verbal tactics and psychological principles with a surgeon’s precision.

He literally goes line-by-line on opening sales conversations. Asking killer questions to qualify buyers. Using “tie-downs” to control the dialogue and deploying various sales closing techniques.

Is some of the content in this sales book feel a bit dated? Sure, but that’s totally forgivable when you realize this book was originally written in 1982. The core sales process still applies with a few modern tweaks.

My only real gripe is Hopkins’ tendency to get a little rah-rah cheesy at times with the YOU-CAN-DO-IT motivational spiel. I don’t need any pep talks! Just give me those juicy practical insights!

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#3. "Pitch Anything" by Oren Klaff.

Pitch Anything - An Innovative Method for Presenting, Persuading, and Winning the Deal - sales book by Oren Klaff

Sales savagery score 8/10

Klaff’s ‘Pitch Anything’ teaches you how to sell like you’re wrestling a grizzly bear. It’s raw, unpredictable, and leaves you wondering if the deal was worth the black eye.

Klaff’s philosophies around establishing dominant “frame control” through psychological power-plays are pretty compelling. At least in theory. His tactics for asserting alpha status and crashing through defenses by triggering those primal “croc brain” instincts pack a punch.

Additionally, his unapologetic rejection of boring, data-packed presentations in favor of lean, high-octane “pitches” loaded with captivating intrigue is fascinating.

However, some of “Pitch Anything” still smells of dated sales tactics, in my opinion. Some of them kinda ignore how real purchases derive from mutual value creation.

While entertaining, Klaff’s rhetoric celebrating manipulation also feels a bit outdated. To be quite frank, beneath the punchy narratives, “Pitch Anything” just repackages reheated sales philosophies from other similar sales books and alpha male cliches rather than real innovative sales methodologies. But hey, maybe that’s what the savage sales professionals really need these days!

#2. "The Sales Assassin" by Anthony Caliendo.

The Sales Assassin - Master Your Black Belt in Sales - sales book by Anthony Caliendo

Sales savagery score 9/10

Caliendo’s “The Sales Assassin” is like a boot camp for sales warriors. It’s intense, unapologetic, and ready to put your delicate ego in a chokehold.

Caliendo skips that rah-rah “champion closer” stuff and hits you with reality check – SALES IS RUTHLESS, RELENTLESS GRIND THAT WILL CRUSH YOUR SOUL without hardcore mental discipline. This ain’t your daddy’s sales book, let me tell ya that!

What separates “The Sales Assassin” from sales books is Caliendo’s first-hand sales experience from decades in sales across multiple highly competitive industries. Anthony shares insights about the psychological torture and rejection that’ll make you flinch, while inspiring you to cultivate the underdog mindset.

Each chapter (or “belt” as Anthony calls them) is packed with practical advice. They get to the core of what separates the real sales assassins from chumps. Caliendo’s tough-love philosophies on work ethic, emotional resilience, and playing mind-games with prospects are uncompromising instant classics.

Now, I gotta give you a heads up though, the martial arts analogies in this sales book do get a bit over-the-top at times. His pressure for exploiting psychological leverage over prospects are… intense, to say the least. Reading about your “SAM” (Sales Assassin Mindset) while choking back eye-rolls is an acquired taste. The martial analogies for things like “mastering your SAM” become corny after a while.

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#1. "Way of the Wolf" by Jordan Belfort.

Way of the Wolf - Straight Line Selling - Master the Art of Persuasion, Influence, and Success - sales book by Jordan Belfort

Sales savagery score 9/10

Jordan Belfort’s “Way of the Wolf” is like a crash course in selling your soul for a commission check. Expect a lot of chest-beating and ego-stroking while you swim in the sales shark tank.

I’ve read my fair share of sales books promising to turn me into a sales savage. But Jordan Belfort’s “Way of the Wolf” takes the cake.

Belfort starts things off by apologizing for being a sleazeball back in his OTC / Pink Sheets penny stock peddling days. Thanks for the disclaimer, Wolfie! From the first self-indulgent pages, Belfort makes zero effort to hide his colossal ego and obsession with his good ol’ glory days. If you can stomach the constant brags about crushing “millions in sales”, more power to you.

However, buried under all the narcissistic rambling are some legit valuable insights into sales situations, buyer’s psychology, vocal mastery, and inner “state management.”

This sales book is basically a comprehensive guide to Belfort’s infamous “Straight Line” sales methodology. It’s a wild ride through psychological mind-trickery and straight-up con artist tactics. Jordan breaks down his sales strategy into simple step-by-step processes even a newbie sales rep can follow to close deals.

To me, what really sets this sales book apart is Belfort’s obsession with tonality. He is really obsessed with tonality. An entire chapter is devoted to using your voice as a “scalpel” to slice through sales objections. Like vocal nuances that could convince your sales manager to wear a tutu for the upcoming quarterly sales team meeting. His practical insights on body language and micro-expressions are also pretty good.

Now, Belfort can come across as an infomercial huckster at times. But hey, the slick sales approach worked for this former wolf of Wall Street.

Overall, if you can stomach Belfort’s unapologetic douchebaggery and if you’re looking for a fresh perspective on the sales process, give “Way of the Wolf” a read. Just be sure to use your new mind-control powers for good!

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Conclusion

I hope you found my list of the best sales books useful or at the very least entertaining. Is the sales game a bloodsport? One where either the predator feasts, or the prey goes hungry. Will you continue following the industry “best practices”? Will you be joining the army of mediocre deal closers? OR are you savage sales beasts ready to become savage deal closing machines? The choice is yours!

P.S. Time for a little disclaimer before I send you all into a commission-crazed frenzy! I’m sure all you plan to play nice. None of those manipulative sales tactics or shady frameworks. Just good old authentic long-term customer relationships building!

About the Author

Our content team of sales, lead generation, and marketing experts provides industry-leading thought leadership on B2B sales and marketing, lead nurturing, and sales enablement strategies. With decades of combined C-suite and VP-level experience, we deliver actionable B2B sales and marketing content that gives B2B companies a competitive advantage. Our proven insights on lead management, conversion rate and sales optimization, sales productivity, and tech stack empower companies to increase revenue growth and ROI.